Fly Tying July 2021: The Seal Bugger

CFF President Dave Kilhefner has announced that the July 24th fish-a-long will be at various Mt. Hood area lakes.

One of the more effective fly patterns you should have in your stilllwater arsenal is the Seal Bugger, a fly that was developed by Denny Rickards over 30 years ago. Denny is a noted stillwater fly fisherman on his home waters of Upper Klamath Lake in southern Oregon where he developed the Seal Bugger.

Denny thought that he could improve on the longtime favorite versatile fly that we know as the Wooly Bugger. By altering the materials and construction he came up with a fly that is famous for enticing trophy trout which is quite evident if you have ever watched any of his videos or presentations. The Seal Bugger looks much like a classic Wooly Bugger except Rickards’ version uses seal fur (or a substitute) dubbing instead of chenille for the body. Other differences include a reduction in the amount of marabou in the tail and also a reduction in the amount of hackle wraps on the body.

The Seal Bugger can be tied in many color variations. Denny’s own website lists 12 different combinations of tail, body, and hackle colors. Tied usually in sizes 8 and 10 and fished on intermediate sink lines the Seal Bugger is a must-have fly for your arsenal when you are heading out to stillwater fishing locations.

I once saw a list that Denny Rickards made of the flies that he would use if he was only allowed to fish with six flies for the rest of his life. The Seal Bugger was number one on the list!

Dave Kilhefner mentioned to me that Lane Hoffman had been tying seal buggers on euro nymph jig hooks and that they were “awesome”. In verifying that with Lane, he says that he has been tying them on jig hooks and “they have been very effective!”. So I would say that it would be interesting to experiment with wooly buggers compared to seal buggers, compared to jig hook seal buggers. Tie up some of each in your favorite colors and report back to the rest of us about which works best. They are probably fished best with intermediate sink lines, varying the depth and retrieve until you find the right combination.

SEAL BUGGER RECIPE
(for both the Lane Hoffman and Denny Rickards versions)
Hook: For Lane Hoffman’s version use a size 12 or 14 euro nymph jig hook with a 60 degree bend; (For Denny Rickard’s version use a Tiemco 5263, or Mustad 9672, or Daiichi 1720, size 8,10)
Weight: For Lane’s version use a 7/64 or 1/8 inch black slotted tungsten bead; (for Denny’s version use 20 wraps .020 lead).
Tail: marabou (fluffy fibers from the side of the marabou feather will give more movement); tied more sparse than wooly bugger; color of choice (Lane prefers olive); add 2 strands pearl flashabou or flash of choice;
Body: Simi Seal, or equivalent (angora with ice dub); color of choice (Lane prefers olive)
Hackle: 4 wraps saddle hackle; undersized compared to wooly bugger; color of choice (Lane prefers olive or orange)
Rib: small copper wire

SEAL BUGGER TYING INSTRUCTIONS
(for both the Lane Hoffman and Denny Rickards versions)

  1. For Lane’s jigged version, place the slotted bead onto the hook and
    secure it with thread wraps.
  2. For Denny’s standard seal bugger, wind 20 wraps of .020 lead wire
    around shank of hook. The wraps should start about one to two hook
    eye’s width behind the eye of the hook. Secure the lead with numerous
    thread wraps.
    *** Steps 3-12 are the same for both Lane’s jigged seal bugger and Denny
    Rickards standard seal bugger.
  3. Tie in a marabou tail, making it a bit more sparse than for a wooly
    bugger.
  4. Add one piece of pearl flashabou to each side of the tail.
  5. Tie in a piece of copper wire for ribbing at the base of the tail. Leave it
    hanging out back of the fly.
  6. Tie in the saddle hackle feather by the tip at the base of the tail. Leave it
    hanging out the back of the fly.
    ***(Prepare your dubbing material at this time.)
  7. Form about a 5 inch dubbing loop at the base of the tail. Wind your
    bobbin to the front.
  8. Load the dubbing loop sparsely with dubbing material and spin the loop
    tight. Wrap the loaded dubbing loop forward, forming the body of the fly.
    Anchor it with thread wraps at the front.
  9. Wind the hackle forward, making four wraps of the hackle. Anchor the
    hackle at the front of the fly with wraps of thread.
  10. Counterwrap the copper wire ribbing forward, taking care to move the
    wire back and forth to miss the hackle fibers. Anchor the wire with
    thread wraps at the front of the fly.
  11. Whip finish and add head cement.
  12. Pick out body hair fibers with a bodkin, brush, or velcro. Take care to
    not damage the hackle.

Fly Tying: June 2021

Bill Schaadt’s Shad Fly
by Jim Adams

I see that Dave Kilhefner has organized a shad fishing (hopefully, a shad catching) Fish-A-Long for June 12th. That could truly be a memorable day in the history of Clackamas Fly Fishers Fish-A-Long outings in terms of numbers of fish caught.

Although Nick Wheeler is no longer at The Royal Treatment fly shop, he is still fondly remembered for the expertise he added to local anglers’ knowledge about flyfishing for shad. Nick spoke to our club on the topic and also was on hand to lead us during an evening of tying up shad flies. Despite the good natured banter he suffered from others in the fly shop, Nick’s enthusiasm for the previously overlooked shad was infectious.

Click here to read an article on Bill Schaadt and his shad fly that is being reprised from the Clackamas Fly Fishers blog from 2018. Much of the information in the article was gathered from an interview I did with Nick, as well as his evening presentation to the club.

Below you can find the Recipe and Tying Instructions for Nick Wheeler’s version of Bill Schaadt’s Shad Fly…
RECIPE:
Hook: Tiemco 3761 #6 ; or Fulling Mill F35085 #8; or similar
Thread: anything hot orange; Nick Wheeler recommends Danville’s Fire Orange flat waxed 210
denier thread (covers well with fewer wraps); a second color of choice would be fluorescent green
Tail: pearlescent krystal flash
Body: silver mylar; size 12 or 10
Eyes: medium size silver bead chain
Head: thread; tapered behind and front of the eyes
Coating: head cement (or Sally Hansen’s or UV resin)
INSTRUCTIONS:
~Lay down a thread base.
~Tie in a tail of about 10-12 strands of krystal flash; trim the tail strands fairly short, about 1/4
to 3/8 inch long.
~Tie in a strand of mylar at the base of the tail. Tie it down with the gold side facing up so
that when you wrap it the silver side will be facing up. Move your bobbin forward.
~Spiral wrap the mylar forward to about the mid-point of the hook, overlapping each wrap
onto the previous one so there are no gaps. Tie it off and remove the excess mylar.
~Use a few figure-8 wraps to tie in the bead chain eyes, at a distance about 1/3 of the hook length back from the hook eye. That should put the eyes at a position slightly more than halfway back from the eye to the mylar. See the drawing below. (Although not essential, anchoring the eyes in with a drop of super glue may be helpful because these flies can take a hammering during your multi-fish day of fishing! )
~Continue wrapping the thread to form the head which will extend from the mylar to the eye of the hook. Taper the head both behind and forward of the bead chain eyes so that the head is thickest at the eyes and then tapers to the front and back. Because of the way you positioned the eyes in Step 5 the taper in front of the eyes will be slightly longer than the taper behind the eyes. Whip finish the head right behind the eye.
~For added durability give the finished fly two coats of head cement over the entire body and head (but not the tail!).
~The bead chain eyes are not centered on the head. The taper of the head in front of the eyes should be longer
than the taper behind the eyes.

Fly Tying; May 2021

Josh Linn’s “MFFR” by Jim Adams

Well, it has been quite some time since the last Fly of the Month article has been posted on the club’s blog. Due to the COVID pandemic our regular club activities have definitely been disrupted. We have not had any of our monthly Fly Tying Nights but they will resume… someday. It has been suggested that we continue posting things of interest regarding Flies and Fly Tying, even though we cannot have our fly tying get-togethers yet. In case you haven’t noticed there is a major “happening” taking place on The Deschutes River as this is being written. The annual salmonfly hatch is in full swing and Josh Linn at the Royal Treatment Fly Shop recently hosted a Zoom presentation that he calls The Salmonfly Survival Guide. If you missed it you can click on this link to have a look. Josh includes a lot of information about presentations, gear, and flies patterns to help you be as successful as possible during the salmonfly hatch.

And that brings us to the MFFR. If you have ever fished the salmonfly hatch you undoubtedly have experimented with a number of different patterns. Everyone seems to have a go-to favorite. Josh has tweaked the popular Norm Woods Special into a fly in which he has a lot of confidence. A foam rubber body on the MFFR is the one alteration that Josh has added that results in improved flotation.

Here is one version of a manufactured Norm Woods Special with a dubbed body:

Below is Josh Linn’s MFFR, his foam body variation of a Norm Woods Special:

Here’s the MFFR recipe—
Hook: TMC 200R size 4
Thread: 10/0 Orange
Body: 2mm Orange Foam
Hackle: Metz #2 Ginger Saddle Hackle
Wing: Tan Calf Tail
Head: Orange Thread
Hackle: Metz #2 Brown Hackle
Check out this link for Josh’s youtube tutorial showing all of the details for tying the MFFR. It is especially interesting to see how Josh colors the foam material, trims it, and then winds it onto the hook shank. Josh then trims the hackle to allow the fly to sit low in the water, much like the naturals. The Royal Treatment will have all of the materials you would need plus they have packaged up some MFFR kits that have enough materials to tie up about 25 MFFRs.

Josh says that the big bugs should be out on the Deschutes through the first week of June so there is still time to get out on the water to take advantage of the salmonfly hatch.

Stay well, folks!

Fly of the Month: Silvernator

The Silvernator by local expert guide Brian Silvey is a relatively quick fly to tie and has great movement in the water. It’s also fun to go a little wild with the color combinations. So get your materials, get creative, and see what color combinations you can come up with!

Originator: Brian Silvey

Tier and Photo Credit: Mike Brown is the owner of Mossy’s Fly Shop in Anchorage, AK.  He’s a lifelong Alaskan with a passion for family, fly fishing, and fly tying

Material List:

  • Tube: Pro Tube Nano Tube
  • Hook Guide/Junction Tube: Pro Tube Hook Guide Medium or Large
  • Thread: Veevus 140 pictured; any strong thread works.
  • Tail: Straight Cut Rabbit Strip
  • Wings: Ostrich Feathers
  • Flash: Holographic Flash or Angle Hair
  • Collar: Schlappen
  • Beadhead: Pro Tube Pro Flexi Bead pictured.

Step 1.  Place your tube with hook guide or junction tubing on to your mandrel, this will give you an idea of how long you want to make your tail.  Start your thread at the base of your junction tube.

Step 2.  Tie in your rabbit strip.  Cut the strip a little bit longer than the end of your junction tube.

Step 3.  Using 5-10 ostrich feathers, tie in on each side of the rabbit strip, I rotated the fly in the picture to show them on each side.  You want the wings to be even with the end of the junction tube or just a little longer.

Step 4.  Tie in your flash, 2-4 strands, and place them along each side of the fly.  Trim the flash with a feather cut to the end of your rabbit tail.

Step 5.  Tie in your schlappen and the base end.

Step 6.  Wrap the schlappen 2-3 turns and tie off.  Whip finish, but don’t build to big of a head.

Step 7.  Slide your bead head on, it should cover up your head and sit firmly again the schlappen collar.

Step 8.  Cut your tube and melt back to secure the bead head.

Fly Tying: March, 2020

Barr’s Slumpbuster

slumpbuster

While on the Owyhee River last June I exchanged reports with another flyfisher. We agreed that the fishing had been challenging, but each had experienced some brown trout success on different streamer patterns we had each been using. I traded one of my Unbalanced Leeches (a Mitch Moyer pattern) for one of his Slumpbusters (a John Barr pattern) and both of us left happy with the exchange. My new acquaintance related that he had fished the Owyhee for many years and the Slumpbuster had always been a top producing pattern for him, so I felt good about adding this new fly to my arsenal.

John Barr:

john-barr

At first, the name of the gentleman that came up with the Slumpbuster didn’t register with me, but it should have. John Barr is the same guy that came up with the widely popular fly called the Copper John, along with other well-known flies like the Vis-A-Dun, the Meat Whistle, and the Barr Emerger. He is a long-time signature tyer for Umpqua Feather Merchants and currently has twenty three of his patterns listed in the Umpqua catalogue. In 2011 Fly Tyer Magazine named John Barr a recipient of their Life Time Achievement Award for his contributions to fly tying. Our club library has a book, cleverly titled “Barr Flies”, where you can learn more about John Barr and his fly patterns. It has great step-by-step instructions, both for tying and how-to-fish his patterns, along with terrific photos by Charlie Craven, another well-known fly tyer.

The Slumpbuster:

Unknown

A fisheries biologist once told John Barr that when brown trout get to be about 16 or 17 inches long their diet shifts from mainly insects to include baitfish (meaning any fish they can swallow). Of course they continue to feed on nymphs and adult insects but, when given the opportunity, large trout will prefer going after a big meal they can get while expending less time and energy. And at the same time fishermen are going to have a greater chance of catching large trout when fishing streamer patterns that mimic baitfish. 

Unknown-2

John Barr with a nice brown that took a black Slumpbuster that was dead drifted.

Barr designed the Slumpbuster to have a baitfish profile. It doesn’t have as much glitz or flash as some other streamer patterns. (However, you could always come up with your own variation by adding flash, legs, brighter colors, etc). But Barr’s theory is that streamers that have a lot of flash will often get follows or passes from fish that turn away at the last moment or eventually seem to lose interest, as if they sense that something is not quite right. 

umpqua-barrs-slump-buster-per-3-1

As far as streamers go, the Slumpbuster is relatively easy to tie and is quite durable. It has a type of uni-body construction with the tail, wing, and collar all tied from the same material, a narrow zonker strip of pine squirrel hide and fur. Barr found that when wet, a Slumpbuster tied with squirrel strips, had a perfect baitfish profile that he preferred over flies tied with the more commonly used rabbit zonker strips.

umpqua-barrs-slump-buster-per-3

Depending on the water you are fishing, the Slumpbuster could be fished on a floating line, sink-tip, intermediate sink, or full sinking lines. As always, the type of retrieve should be varied until you find what is working. Sometimes long and slow strips will work, and other times short and fast, or erratic strips may be the answer. Barr says he likes to fish two Slumpbusters at a time, with a smaller one tied off the bend of a larger one with 18 inches of tippet. (With each fly weighted at the front, that combination must be a challenge to cast!?)

images-3

If you have ever felt like your fishing success was in a slump, perhaps you should try a Slumpbuster! Join us for our next Fly Tying Night on Wednesday, March 25th at the Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn. We’ll be tying up some Slumpbusters in a couple of colors. Bring your vise and tools if you have them, or we can loan you some. The fun will start at 6:00 pm and will go to about 7:30. Hope to see you there!

slumpbusters

Fly Tying: February, 2020

Phil Hager Flies

A few month’s back I sent out an email mentioning that anyone was welcome to be the guest fly tyer at one of our monthly Fly Tying Nights, with an opportunity to share a favorite fly pattern. The response was remarkably underwhelming, but club member Phil Hager did reply and he has agreed to be our guest tyer for February.

Meet CFF Club Member Phil Hager (aka “flyfishingphil”)  :

10485925_10152768785807938_8864995943808819032_n

Phil is a longtime fly fisher, having started out on bamboo rods and silk fly lines way back in 1952. His career as a firefighter was shortened when injuries forced him to retire in 1983. He then got into broadcasting and moved to central Oregon in 1986. A final retirement in 1992 allowed him to “fish 5 days a week, 50 weeks a year.” After pretty much figuring out the challenge of fishing rivers and streams, Phil moved on to learning about lakes and other stillwaters in about the year 2000.

A quote from Phil that pretty much sums up his philosophy:  “Fly fishing is not so much a sport as it is a way of life.”

I had met and talked with Phil briefly before, but in gathering information for this article I have found that Phil has been active in fly fishing in so many ways that go beyond just fishing. In the past he has served as president of the Central Oregon Flyfishers as well as serving on the Oregon and International Councils of the Federation of Fly Fishers. Phil has given numerous presentations on fishing central Oregon and stillwater fishing, as well as classes on casting and the “secret” of picking the right rod.

I recently found a CD, that I forgot I had, called “The Fishing COW cd”, which I had purchased about 10 years ago during one of our club meetings. (The letters COW stand not for your favorite bovine animal, but for Central Oregon Waters.) Closer inspection showed that it was made by the evening’s speaker, none other than…Phil Hager. If you were a club member about 10 years ago you should check to see if you may still have a copy of the CD. It has a wealth of information in it , including maps and tips, about many of our favorite central Oregon fly fishing destinations.

Phil says his flies are pretty much “guide flies”, meaning quick and easy. They are so quick and easy that, during our February Fly Tying Night, Phil will be sharing not one, but two of his proven patterns, the Brick Leech and the TnMC. I have repeatedly seen the names of these two flies show up on the club blog’s monthly Fishing Reports where Phil has given an account of their effectiveness.

Phil’s Brick Leech:

      IMG_6594

Phil came up with this pattern after helping an ODFW biologist who was doing stomach sampling to check the diet of fish at Diamond Lake. He says that it’s been “one of my prime flies for about a dozen years on lakes, rivers, streams, for anything that swims there.”

Although Phil has tied up this same leech pattern in a number of colors, he says the rust color of his Brick Leech is by far the most productive. The “leech yarn” that he uses comes in 20 different colors, some of which are shown below.

IMG_6603         IMG_6599        IMG_6601 2 Phil fishes his Rusty Leech with all types of lines, and has caught fish from just sub-surface down to 45-50 feet. A couple of years ago he lost track of the number of rainbows and kokanee that he caught in just one hour of fishing at Lava Lake.

Phil’s TnMC :

IMG_6610

The letters TnMC stand for “Thread and Micro Chenille”. The development of the fly happened at Hosmer Lake where Phil saw fish slurping all around him. When he finally was able to see what the fish were taking, he tied up what became the TnMC, and then he got tired of catching fish after two hours. Phil says this is one of his prime flies that he uses everywhere. Black is by far the most productive color, but at times, Phil has found other colors, such as those shown below, to be effective.

IMG_6622          IMG_6608

Join us at the Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn for our next Fly Tying Night on Wednesday, February 26th. Phil Hager will be leading us through his tips on tying up  and fishing the Brick Leech and the TnMC. Both of these flies are easy to tie and would be suitable for tyers of all levels of experience. Plus, Phil has some interesting tips on finishing and tying off flies that he will be sharing. We start at 6:00 pm sharp. Hope to see you there!

 

Fly Tying: January, 2020

Crandall’s Provider

watertimeoutfitters_Fly_Patterns_CrandallsProviderwatertimeoutfitters_Fly_Patterns_CrandallsProvider

It’s cold. It’s rainy… It must be time for winter steelhead!

Every steelheader is always looking for “The Fly”, the “Go-To” fly that immediately boosts his or her confidence… the fly that convinces you that the odds of hooking a fish have turned in your favor. When checking in with the guys at The Royal Treatment about a winter steelhead fly suggestion for our next Fly Tying Night, they pointed me in the direction of the Crandall’s Provider, a fly they described as being Rob Crandall’s most productive fly.

xl-long-provider

As you probably know, Rob of Water Time Outfitters, is a well-respected local guide that grew up on the banks of the Clackamas River. So, when I went to the fly bins to get a closer look at a Crandall’s Provider, alas, the bin was empty. That alone tells you something. The Royal Treatment staff say they have a hard time keeping this fly in stock.

(Personally, I know that when Rob speaks about steelhead, I listen. As do lots of other people. This past Saturday the Royal Treatment hosted another, always popular, Rob Crandall Winter Steelhead Seminar. And, as always, it was standing room only.)

Provider

A few years back Nick Wheeler was on a trip with Rob on the Oregon coast. At the time Rob was working on the design for his Provider. He handed Nick his prototype and cautioned him that he only had that one fly and he better not lose it! Well, things turned out well that day. Rob figured he had a winning pattern as Nick proceeded to land three steelhead! 

10759454032_IMG_4278

A fine steelhead landed by Nick Wheeler on a Crandall’s Provider

The Crandall Provider seems to have everything that appeals to discerning steelhead. The black and blue colors have long been a combination favored by steelheaders. The ostrich herl provides a lot of movement and the red guinea collar adds a hint of bloody gills in the pattern. Add some flash materials and you have a steelhead fly that will be effective at any time of year. 

A quote about the Crandall’s Provider from The Royal Treatment Newsletter, 11/30/19: “This is quite possibly the most popular and proven steelhead fly we stock.”

Our next Fly Tying Night will be your chance to tie up your own Crandall’s Provider. We’ll be meeting at 6pm on Wednesday, January 22nd at The Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn.  (Note: This date comes one day after our general membership meeting. This is a change from our usual Fly Tying Night schedule in order to accommodate a logjam of activities involving the Royal Treatment facility and staff.) Hope you can join us!

crandallsprovider-2-1

Fly Tying: November, 2019

Fly Tying 101:  Beginning Fly Tying— Tools, Tips, and Techniques

Unknown

Fly fishing is a great pastime and there are few things in the sport as satisfying as landing a fish on a fly that was created by your own hands. Do you have an interest in fly tying but you don’t know where to start? Do the terms whip finisher, dubbing loop, bobbin, and hair stacker make your head spin because they sound like part of a foreign language?  Or have you attended a previous fly tying night and went away discouraged when you came to the quick realization that you were in way over your head? 

images-2

I have been approached by a few club members that have wondered when we were going to have another Fly Tying Night aimed at the those folks that are really novices, including those that have never tied a single fly.  So we will be going back to the basics in November, covering the standard tools and techniques that you will need to get started on a very interesting and rewarding hobby.  Everyone should walk away with at least one fly that is ready to be field tested on the water.  And who knows, with the holiday season just around the corner, you may end up with some great ideas for your Santa Claus wish list in December.  

5b85d1fceac5c79e6b634d9b_Girl-Tying

So join us for an evening of beginning level fly tying on Wednesday, November 20th. (Note: This is the day after our CFF general meeting on the 19th. This is a change from our usual Fly Tying Night schedule in order to stay away from having the class the day before Thanksgiving.) We’ll be meeting at The Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn at 6:00 p.m.  Bring your own fly tying tools if you have them.  If you don’t have any equipment come anyway.  Our friends at The Royal Treatment will loan you everything you need. See you there!

GO-OnTheFly-GPI-091516-1240x930

(If you are an experienced tyer that would like to come to help the beginners get off to a good start please join us. We had some experienced helpers that assisted at our last Beginning Fly Tying class and it was soooo very helpful!)

4824

Fly Tying: October, 2019

The Comet

images

It has been a club tradition for a number of years to head to the Oregon coast for our November Fish-A-Long where we go after Chum Salmon. It is hoped that by our November 9th outing we will have received enough rain (but hopefully not too much!) to draw these fish into our coastal rivers. The Kilchis River is our normal destination although the Miami River also has a run of chums.  If you have some extra time this fall, there are many more opportunities to catch chum salmon in Washington waters.  In fact, the WDFW website has a note indicating that Chum salmon are the most abundant wild salmon species in Washington state. Be sure to check out the Washington regulations if you are planning to head up there.

Ramones-Salmon-Killer

Chum salmon are sometimes  regarded as the “ugly stepsister” of all of the species of Pacific salmon.  They can be chrome bright while still in the ocean but soon begin to develop characteristic markings as they prepare to enter freshwater.  After entering rivers chums are readily identifiable by their characteristic olive green coloration with purplish vertical striping and blotches along their sides. 

Chum Salmon– Ocean Phase                        Chum Salmon– Spawning Male

Chum salmon are sometimes referred to as dog salmon, with research showing two possible origins for that name.  One explanation is that name comes from the impressive mouthful of sharp teeth seen in the males as they approach spawning time.  A second explanation is that the reference to dog salmon comes from the habit of Native Americans feeding the flesh of the chum salmon to their dogs.  Chums are not known for their aerial acrobatics but they fight like bulldogs and are not brought in easily, so don’t go light in selecting your gear.

images-3

Impressive Teeth! Be sure to bring a good set of pliers.

This month we will be tying up a fly called The Comet. Don Conway of Seattle is credited with coming up with the design for this fly back in 1934 and It was later popularized by Grant King in the salmon and steelhead rivers of northern California in the 1940’s. While we will be targeting Chum salmon there is no reason to think that it would not be effective for any of the species of Pacific salmon, as well as steelhead.  I have also read reports that the Comet is also an effective smallmouth bass pattern.  For Chums the fly is normally tied in chartreuse.  There is an old saying in regard to chum salmon… “it’s no use if it ain’t chartreuse”, regardless of the specific fly pattern.  However, many anglers report that if the chums aren’t responding to chartreuse flies it is time to switch to something that is hot pink.  So hopefully, we will have both the time and materials to tie up both chartreuse and pink Comets.  And if something happens with the weather and it messes with the Kilchis Fish-A-Long, all is not lost, as these flies can also be used as dandy steelhead patterns.

il_340x270.1832683297_9rai

Join us at the Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn on Wednesday, October 23.  Even if you are not planning to attend the Kilchis River fish-a-long the Comet would be a fly to have in various colors in your steelhead, salmon or smallmouth bass fly box. The Comet is not a difficult fly to tie and would be suitable for tyers of all abilities or experience.

We’ll see you at 6 pm !

Gil Henderson (left) and Lane Hoffman (right) with Kilchis River chum salmon.