CFF Auction: Redington Vice Combo

The March CFF auction will be for a Redington VICE 9′ 5wt fly rod and an i.D. reel with backing and line. (descriptions follow) This outfit retails for $299.99.

The auction will run until 5 p.m. on Monday, March 18, and will only be open to paid up CFF members.  To make a bid or follow the bidding go to Auctions. Let me know if you have any questions. bartschp@gmail.com

Redington VICE Fly Fishing Outfit - Fly Rod & Reel Combo

“The VICE is a classically styled, fast-action rod range designed to be accessible to all anglers. The multi-modulus carbon fiber blanks offer increased levels of recovery for casting with greater accuracy and control, and the subtle design touches like black anodized snake guides, laser -etched reel seats, and saltwater-grade components all work together to create a fly rod that anglers can’t resist.”

“The new i.D fly reel is one of the most exciting product introductions we’ve ever made. It features a flat back surface to accept custom decals representing anything from your home state to your favorite fish species, and the decals are simple to remove, stack, or swap to update your reel’s look over time. There is no better product to define your identity as an angler. The i.D features sturdy cast aluminum construction, a smooth rulon disc drag, and a large arbor for speedy line retrieve. A wide variety of decals are available for customization and personal expression.”

March 19 Speaker John DeVoe

John DeVoe, executive director of WaterWatch of Oregon, will be CFF’s guest speaker Tuesday, March 19th.

John will explain some of the very important water allocation issues we are facing both now and in the future. Lisa Brown from WaterWatch will accompany him to explain her ongoing work on our own Clackamas River. It will be a very informative presentation.

Here’s some links to recent news articles where WaterWatch has defended some of CFF’s favorite waters:

https://pamplinmedia.com/ttt/89-news/246164-114003-court-sides-with-water-watch-in-clackamas-river-case

https://www.opb.org/news/article/water-fight-on-clackamas-river-continues/

http://waterwatch.org/?s=clackamas+river&x=0&y=0

http://waterwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Bend-Source-011619-LTE-Crooked.pdf

March 16 Westmoreland Pond Cleanup

WHAT: Come lend a hand working with the City of Portland Department of Parks and Recreation to clean debris from the pond in preparation for it being filled. The pond is one of the largest casting facilities in the world, and we are fortunate to still have it for public use. Maintenance funds are always in short supply, so our volunteer support is important.

WHERE: Meet at the west side of the Westmoreland Casting Pond, SE 22nd Avenue and Rex Street, just off of McLoughlin Boulevard.

WHEN: Saturday, March 16th from 8:30 am until 1200 noon.

CONTACT: Please RSVP to Steve Gomes via email at tauermunki@gmail.com

Fly Tying: March, 2019

Simi Seal Leech

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Last year club member Dave Kilhefner educated me about the term “guide flies”, those flies which can be created with a minimal number of materials.  A minimal number would be three or fewer materials, according to Dave.  That magic number of three doesn’t generally include the hook or thread, or weight (which is often optional). I watched Brian Silvey tie one of the flies that he designed— Silvey’s Caddis Pupa.  The recipe he provides has at least two materials that he usually doesn’t include when he ties that fly for himself and his clients.  Obviously that “guide” version is quicker and easier to tie, and in Brian’s view is still just as effective as the complete version. 

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This month we are going to tie the ultimate “guide fly”, one that has only one material ! The fly is called the Simi Seal Leech.  There is a gentleman in Arizona named John Rohmer who is the owner of John Rohmer Materials (azflyfishing.net).  He has come up with a material that he calls “Arizona Simi Seal”, which refers to a material that simulates natural seal fur, which at one time was very popular for fly tying but is pretty much unavailable today.  And John Rohmer’s Simi Seal Leech is created using only Arizona Simi Seal (again, not counting the hook, thread, or weight if you want to add it).  Don’t think that this material can only be used for this one fly, as it is very versatile and can easily be used in many nymph and streamer patterns.

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A sample of “Canadian Brown” Simi Seal showing the complex blend of fibers.

Simi Seal is a blend of natural and synthetic fibers that come in 50 different color combinations.  Of course John’s advertising on the packaging encourages you to “Try Every Color”!  And the 50 colors of Simi Seal is really just the tip of the iceberg because he also has other tying materials for sale, with names like Arizona Diamond Dub, Arizona Minnow Hair, and the list goes on.  All of these are apparently created in the basement of a secret warehouse that is located somewhere in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona using a specially built blending machine.  If my math is correct the number of Rohmer’s dubbing blends of different types totals 258!  That blending machine must really get a workout!

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Simi Seal Leeches can be tied weighted or unweighted.

The Simi Seal Leech pattern is most productive in still waters but certainly has proven to  also be effective in rivers and streams.  The pattern is called a leech but its movement can simulate many life forms in the water, including baitfish, dragonfly nymphs, damsel nymphs, crawdads, etc., depending on the color, how it is weighted, and how it is retrieved.  Weighting with a bead head can produce an attractive undulating motion.  Some fish respond well to a fly with weight wrapped evenly along the shank of the hook resulting in a more level motion as you move the fly through the water. Unweighted versions of the Simi Seal Leech can be very effective especially when fished over weedbeds.  Rohmer has found that dark patterns are effective in low light conditions, especially early morning and late evening.  And he likes adding rubber legs when fishing for browns or bass. 

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Simi Seal Leeches can be dressed heavily or sparsely.

We had a terrific turnout of 15 club members for our last fly tying session.  Join us for our next Fly Tying Night on Wednesday, March 27th to tie up a variety of Simi Seal Leeches.  The club’s Fish-A-Longs for the months of April, May and June are all scheduled for stillwater locations so the Simi Seal Leech will be a good pattern to have in your arsenal. We will also demonstrate how you can easily produce your own version of a “simi seal” dubbing material.  We meet at The Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn and will be starting at 6 pm.  Hope to see you there!

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February 2019 CFF Fishing Reports

Greg O’Brien had a decent day float tubing in early February at an Oregon Fishing Club lake. The day started slow but after figuring out the depth and retrieve the fish wanted things picked up. Several rainbows up to 16” were netted and released.

In mid February Trux Dole and Dave Kilhefner fished at Little Tree and Big Tree Lakes at the Oregon Fishing Club. Water temperature was 42 degrees and had a pea green color with 2-3 feet of visibility. The weather was overcast and cold with a light dusting of snow on the ground. We planned to fish from 9am until 1pm. Unfortunately the trout did not start biting until 12:45 so we stayed until 1:30pm and ended up landing 6 nice trout using White Devils and Red Snow Cone Chironomids.

Dave Kilhefner landed & released this “snowstorm steelhead” on the Sandy River the day after the fish-a-long.

President’s Message March 2019

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As you read we had a dozen members brave the elements and attend the Sandy River fish-a-long. It turned out to be a okay morning with almost everyone spending some time on the water. The company and the lunch were great. Our thanks to Dave and Sheryl Kilhefner for hosting the event. Next we have out sights on the Crooked River in March.

Our Founding Gold Sponsor, Mark Bachmann gave a great presentation on Spey lines and tips to a packed room. He fielded a number of questions and everyone came away with a better understanding of the lines.

In March we will welcome John DeVoe from the Waterwatch organization. John will share information and activities of there efforts to protect our waterways. It should be interesting and informative.

Again, coming up in Albany on 3/8-9/19 is the Northwest Fly Tiers & Fly Fishing Expo at the Linn County Expo Center. Check it out.

Remember our sponsors are they are the lifeblood of the club. Stop by their shops and let them know your appreciate their support. Better yet buy something or book a outing with them.

Gil Henderson

Sandy River Fish-A-Long Report

In spite of winter storm warnings, last weekends Sandy River fish-a-long was well attended. Thank you to everyone that came and once again an extra big thank you to Cheryl Kilhefner for more excellent cooking and hospitality.

The cold weather the last few weeks had the river running very low and clear. The average flow this time of year on the Marmot gauge is 1500 CFS but last weekend the flows were half of that at 700 CFS. Water temperature was chilly 38°

Everyone arrived about 8 AM and we had hot coffee and pastries, enjoying the warmth of the great indoors while we eyeballed the cold winter landscape with a light dusting of snow outside. But we could not stay inside all day so soon we all pulled on our waders, grabbed our fly rods and hit the river.

We did a great job covering the water but unfortunately no steelhead were hooked. We fished until around noon and then enjoyed a delicious lunch of pulled pork chili and cornbread muffins.

Next months fish-a-long is at the Crooked River, a popular and productive fishery. We look forward to seeing you there!

CFF February Fish-A-Long

This month’s Fish-A-Long will be held Saturday, February 23rd on the Sandy River. The location is Dave K’s place about halfway between Sandy and Welches.

  • What: Winter Steelhead
  • Where: Sandy River
  • When: 8am until lunchtime (or later), Saturday, February 23rd
  • Equipment:
  • Spey or Switch Rod
  • Skagit Line & sink tip(s)
  • 15lb tippet material
  • flies, bright patterns and dark patterns
  • waders & wading staff
  • rain gear
  • warm, layered clothing

Directions– take Hwy 26 like you are going to Mt Hood. 10 miles past Sandy, turn left onto Sleepy Hollow Drive (there’s a big sign) and then take the 1st left. It’s a steep gravel driveway with a black metal gate.

We will have coffee, breakfast snacks and a hot lunch. This fish a long will focus on spey casting and swung fly presentations. Questions; email or call Paul Brewer or Dave Kilhefner. Hope to see you there!

Fishing isn’t hot but fish have been caught!

Fly Tying : February, 2019

Fall Baetis  (Quill Body Baetis)

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Most reports indicate that steelhead fishing has been less than stellar so far this winter.  If things should suddenly turn around and the fishing picks up, hopefully you are stocked up with enough winter steelhead flies to carry you through the season.  But as far as Fly Tying Nights go, we are moving on to trout for the next few months. 

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Our next scheduled Fly Tying Night comes a few weeks before the club’s scheduled Fish-A-Long on the Crooked River in March. If you look at the numbers of fish, this river is one of the most productive trout waters in Oregon. When reading the fishing report from the club’s trip last year to the Crooked River, one thing you will notice is that everyone caught fish! That is a testament to the recovery of trout numbers in the Crooked River after a disastrous die off in the winter of 2015-16 due to a low snow pack and low water flow.  The numbers of redband trout per mile was estimated at 8,000 fish per mile by a ODFW survey as recently as 2013.  In 2016 the numbers dipped down to 350 fish per mile, while an encouraging survey completed in June,2018 showed that the numbers have bounced back to an estimated 3,500 fish per mile in the 8 mile stretch below Bowman Dam.

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If you stock up on zebra midges and blue wing olive patterns you are going to be well prepared for most days in the winter and spring on the Crooked River. I listened to a gentleman named Mike McCoy give a presentation where he talked about fishing the Crooked River.  Mike is from Battle Ground, WA and, besides being an avid flyfisher, he owns a highly thought-of company called Snake Brand Guides which supplies guides and reel seats for fly rod builders.  Mike’s go-to fly for the Crooked is called a Fall Baetis.  In spite of the name “Fall” Baetis, the hatch of blue wing olives (baetis) that we come across on the Crooked hatch is strongest from late winter into early summer.

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We will be tying up some quill body baetis flies following Mike McCoy’s recipe.  The pattern has that characteristic segmented segmented body that looks so good on flies. The quills we will be using are stripped peacock quills, which have a flattened shape and a unique color shading that helps to produce the desired segmented body appearance. At our Fly Tying Night we will be discussing which parts of a peacock feather you can use for these flies and how to strip them, as well as sources of commercially prepared peacock quills.  For those tyers that find using the quills a little frustrating there will be a chance to learn alternative ways to achieve a segmented look on the bodies of these small flies.

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Careful wrapping of the quill results in a beautifully segmented body.

Join us at the Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn on Wednesday, February 27 for our next Fly Tying Night where we will be learning to work with peacock quills to tie up some quill body flies.  They will be perfect for the club’s outing on the Crooked River but will also be effective on all waters where blue wing olives are present. (And that is everywhere!)  We’ll be starting at 6:00 pm sharp.  Hope to see you there!