Egg Patterns

Like all fly anglers, I am always on the lookout for new information to improve my chances of landing fish. I pay particular attention to those fellow flyfishers who I know have skills and experience that surpass my own. So years ago when our own Dave Kilhefner told me he had recently enjoyed a 100 fish trip on the Deschutes, he immediately had my attention. When I inquired about his secret fly or flies, he simply said… “egg patterns”. On that particular trip Dave had started out chasing steelhead but the steelheading proved to be unproductive. Turning to trout as a diversion he found he had an easy time taking advantage of the trout keying in on the eggs being scattered by the chinook salmon that are in the Deschutes at this time of the year. On the Deschutes I am usually trying to crack the code about what bug is hatching and what stage of the life cycle I should be using. So thank you, Dave, for opening my eyes to another possibility of what I should be carrying in my box of trout flies.

Here is a general recipe and one method of tying instructions for a Glo-Bug type of egg pattern:

GLO-BUG EGG PATTERN

RECIPE
Hook: Tiemco 2457, Mustad C67S, Daiichi 1120, or equivalent; #6 – #14
Thread: 6-0 or stronger; color to match the color of the egg
Body: Glo-Bug yarn or McFly Foam; color of choice (Note: Many people find the McFly Foam easier to work with. It tends to form a tighter, more dense egg.)

TYING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Lay down a base of thread at the front 1/3 of the hook.

2. Secure two or three clumps of GloBug yarn or McFly Foam on top of the hook shank with 4 firm wraps of thread. Keep the material on top of the hook shank. (The thickness and number of the clumps will depend on the size of the hook used. You will need to experiment to find the right amount of material.) To form a “blood dot” or “eye” in the egg, lay a narrow strip of yarn/foam of a contrasting color on top of the original clumps of yarn/foam.

3. Secure the clumps with 8 wraps right in front of the clumps. Then, while pulling up on the clumps, circle the base horizontally with three tight wraps of thread. Whip finish and apply head cement.

4. Pull up firmly on the yarn or foam and trim it all at once in a slight arc.

5. Work the yarn/foam around the hook to form a round egg. Trim as needed.

***Important tip***

”The key to tying a good egg pattern is to tie a SMALL one. 95% of the ones I see are too big…For trout I like to copy a 6mm bead and have it be that size or a little smaller.”

Check out these links for some good videos with tips for tying Glo-Bug eggs:

EGGO WEIGHTED EGG PATTERN

An Eggo Fly is weighted egg pattern and makes a good anchor fly. Here is a general recipe along with tying instructions for an Eggo pattern:

RECIPE
Hook: Tiemco 2457, Mustad C67S, Daiichi 1120, or equivalent; #6 or #8
Thread: 6-0; color of choice
Eyes: Lead eyes
Body: Chenille, Crystal Chenille, or Estaz; color of choice

TYING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Lay down a thread base where you will want to anchor the lead eyes.

2. Anchor the eyes with multiple figure-8 wraps of thread. Further secure the eyes with horizontal wraps below the eyes but above the hook shank. Apply super glue to the wraps.

3. Use thread to anchor a length of chenille right behind the eyes.

4. Use figure-8 wraps to form a round egg shape around the lead eyes, tying it off in front of the eyes. Whip finish. Apply head cement or super glue.

Here is a nice illustrated article from Dave Kilhefner showing the steps for tying the Eggo Fly.

Dave has produced another fine article titled “Egg Fly Fishing Secrets” that appeared in Flyfishing and Tying Journal. I would think this should be required reading for those flyfishers planning on fishing egg patterns, especially those club members heading to this month’s fish-a-long at Beavertail on the Deschutes.

Check out the following link: https://ftjangler.com/blogs/fly-fishing/egg-fly-fishing-secrets-by-dave-kilhefner

Additionally, here’s an excellent article from Mark Bachmann of The Fly Fishing Shop on fishing egg flies: https://flyfishusa.com/egg-flies.aspx#eggflies

And finally, here is a drawing from Dave showing a suggested way of rigging up for fishing your egg patterns (Pay attention here… remember, Dave had a 100 fish trip on the Deschutes!) —

Presidents Message October 2021

October is one of my favorite months of the year and one big reason is the October Fish A Long at Beavertail Campground on the Deschutes River. With the great fishing and canyon scenery it’s hard to beat! It will be on Saturday, October 23rd and in the past many of us have camped there. I’ll get the details of this popular Fish A Long out the week before.

For our October 19th meeting, I’ve been thinking Maybe we could have both a Zoom and In-Person meeting? I think it’s possible. Basically, the presentation would be on Zoom and at that point it’s pretty easy to hook a laptop to big screen TV for the in-person folks. Stay tuned as those details will be emailed to you a week before the meeting.

Speaking of email, we will go back to having email reminders every time a new blog is posted (this is called an RSS feed). For our club, this is the easiest & most popular to keep the information flowing.

Brad Jonasson want’s everyone to know the Fly Fishing Challenge is still open and to sign up if you haven’t already.

For several years now we have been posting monthly fishing reports. Looking back on them is a good way to get ideas for local flyfishing opportunities currently happening or coming up. I’ve tested it out; type the word  October or November in the search box and you’ll get all the past reports for that month.

With all the fly fishing opportunities this month try using the Meet Up function on our Webpage Forum to schedule fishing trips with other members.

Late next week I’ll post the September club reports and I’m happy to report we have some good stuff.

Please remember our sponsors this fall, they are the lifeblood of the club. Stop by their shops and let them know you appreciate their support. Better yet buy something or book a trip.

Good fishing!

Dave Kilhefner

September 2021 Fish Along Report

Thanks to everyone that attended our September 25th Fish A Long for Coastal Sea Run Cutthroat. This was an “exploratory” trip for our club, meaning most of us had only a vague idea of where to go or how to fish for Sea Run Cutthroat Trout. However, by the end of day we had a much better handle on what to do to be successful as you’ll see.

My day started early, waking up at 4am to finish packing and pick up George in Sherwood for the drive to the coast. We arrived in Tillamook just as it was getting light but had no idea where to start, so we drove around for about 45 minutes checking out various fishing access points along the lower Trask River. We eventually settled on the OFC #2/Burdick location a few miles above tidewater. There we were soon joined by Rich and his son. Since Rich actually knows how to catch Sea Runs, having him arrive at the same place as us was a confidence booster.

Rich and his son went downstream and George and I went upstream. We saw a few salmon rolling and a few guide boats pulling their way thru the super shallow riffles. The water was very low at only 74 cfs, gin clear and probably in the mid 60’s. After the warm summer the rocks were super slippery too so you had to move slow while wading. We saw a few cutthroat jumping in the deeper water close to the bank, but being new to the game couldn’t get into casting range without spooking them. We later learned from Rich it’s important to do your wading on the shallow side, then be stealthy as you cast to the far bank on the deep side then strip your fly back pretty fast; and keep moving! I walked upstream on what felt like a slip & slide and found a pool that allowed me to fish the correct way and connected with a small feisty Cutthroat. Downstream Rich got two nice Cutthroats in the 16-18 inch range. Around mid morning we decided to go to the Sollie Smith Bridge area on the lower Wilson and it was pretty much a repeat of our Trask experience: Rich got a couple nice ones and the rest of us got a small resident trout or two.

As I mentioned earlier, this was an “exploratory” Fish A Long. I received a few texts from people wondering where to go, but as I said earlier I didn’t really know where to go thus couldn’t really offer any advice better than “somewhere along the lower river would probably be best.” Sorry for my lack of knowledge, but our club made big strides on this fishery and next year will be better!

This fish a long was well attended and over a dozen of us met at the Wilson River Footbridge Trailhead.  Our club has a new sign that Ken generously helped design so people can find us when we are out in the boonies chasing fish. It was fun to trade fish stories from the day and nearly everyone got fish, but to be unusually honest for a fisherman not all were Sea Run Cutts! But, it was a very nice day and good times were had by all. Thanks again to everyone that helped make this fish a long a success. I’m sure we will do it again next year!

Sea Run Cutthroat Flies

It was good to receive Dave Kilhefner’s email about our upcoming fish-a-long on the Wilson and Trask Rivers for Sea Run Cutthroat Trout. According to some anglers, Sea Run Cutthroats (aka Blue Backs, Harvest Trout, Cutts, or Cutties) are arguably the best overlooked trout fly fishery in the state. So overlooked that even Dave K. says he has never targeted sea run cutthroats! (What a shock! I didn’t think there was a fish species in Oregon that had escaped being searched out by Dave.)

As their name implies, Sea Run Cutthroat trout divide their time between fresh and salt water. Unlike their relatives, the salmon and steelhead, they do not migrate far from their home rivers and return there in late summer, entering the estuaries in July and August, eventually working their way farther upstream. Cutties are aggressive predatory feeders and are known to be eager in going after artificial fly patterns.

I stopped in at The Royal Treatment fly shop looking for flies and sea run cutthroat information. Randy Stetzer, author of the book called “Flies: The Best One Thousand”, told me that you should keep moving if you are not finding fish. If the fish are there they are likely to be going after your fly. They like cover, so be fishing for them around logs, large rocks, root wads, cut banks, and shady areas. Josh Linn put me onto two fly patterns that seem to be on the go to list of many anglers: the Borden Special and the Reverse Spider.

Borden Special (developed in 1961 by Bob Borden, founder of HareLine Dubbin)

Recipe—
Hook: TMC 3761 #4-10, or equivalent 1X long hook
Thread: black 6/0, 8/0
Tail: yellow and pink hackle fibers
Rib: small silver tinsel
Body: hot pink rabbit or synthetic dubbing
Wing: white arctic fox or other suitable white hair
Collar: wraps of saddle hackle or schlappen; hot pink in front of yellow

Tying Instructions for the Borden Special—
Click on the following link to see Jay Nicholas tying his version of the Borden Special.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpVhdjSU5ag

Reverse Spider (more of a style of fly than one specific fly pattern)

Reverse spider tied with
Lady Amherst tippet
Reverse spider tied with mallard flank

Recipe—
Hook: TMC 3761 #6-10
Thread: color of choice 6/0,8/0
Tail: feather fibers, or no tail at all
Rib: silver tinsel
Body: synthetic or natural dubbing; or chenille; color(s) of choice
Hackle: Lady Amherst pheasant tippet, or mallard flank fibers, or rooster or saddle hackles; color of choice; tied in with the fibers in reverse style, facing forward over the hook eye

Tying Instructions for the Reverse Spider—
Click on the following link to see Washington angler Preston Singletary’s version of a
Reverse Spider using Lady Amherst pheasant tippet:
http://www.flyanglersonline.com/flytying/fotw2/080706fotw.php

Click on the following link to see Jay Nicholas tying his version of the Reverse Spider
using saddle hackle:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apv2IhMG3Dc

New club member Keaton Andreas is excited as he looks forward to his first fish-a-long. He forwarded some information to Dave Kilhefner about his experience in August with a guide on the Nestucca River fishing for sea run cutthroats. Keaton indicated that the fishing got better when he fished a reverse spider that was weighted, allowing his fly to get down to the fish. Try to track him down at the fish-a-long because he says he is going to tie up as many as he can and that he is willing to share them with others.

Keaton’s weighted Reverse Spider

Here is Keaton’s recipe for the weighted reverse spider he used:
Hackle: Chartreuse Lady Amherst Tippet
Head: Black Nickel Tungsten Bead
Body: Medium Light Olive Chenille
Tail: Chartreuse Lady Amherst Tippet

For more details about fishing for Sea Run Cutthroat trout check out the following links that Jay Nicholas posted on the Oregon Flyfishing Blog:

Sea Run Cutthroat Primer:
http://oregonflyfishingblog.com/2017/09/19/sea-run-cutthroat-primer-september-2017-part-2-of-3/

Sea Run Cutthroat Fishing and Behavior:
http://oregonflyfishingblog.com/2017/09/25/sea-run-cutthroat-fishing-behavior-september-2017-part-3-of-3/

August 2021 Fishing Reports

August was another hot month but CFF members were able to get out and enjoy some good fishing. Thanks to everyone for contributing your fishing reports!

Here are our August reports; pictures first with the report following. Enjoy!

From Greg O’Brien: I started the month with a guided tiger Muskie trip with Mike Sturza that culminated in about a million casts with an 11 wt, 1 missed shot, numerous follows and a sore body  My buddy got one though. I then floated the Deschutes with my brother and a couple other friends and got some nice trout on swung flies. Finally I switched to warm water mode and got a few bass and a 20” pikeminnow in the Willamette close to home.  

From Ron Maben: Fished the Metolius River, which is new water for me.  The upper skinny water fished quite well for 8in – 11in fish, on a #14 light colored elk hair caddis; it was pleasant small water dry fly fishing. Then I fished down river from the hatchery & saw fish feeding on the surface but couldn’t tell what they were taking but they seemed to be ignoring the caddis on the water. Put on a #16 quigleys cripple and instantly tied into a measured 16 + inch fish that made three strong runs taking lots of line before I could finally get it to net. When I netted the fish, people across the river applauded!  

From Tim McSweeney: Spent a week on the Metolius chasing bull trout and red sides. The fishing was spectacular with bulls up to 30” from morning till afternoon and then dry fly fishing for redsides till I couldn’t see. It was a really great week fishing in many different ways.

From Dennis Murphy: August was a busy month and it was hard to find time to get out to the water. I had a couple trips, some successful and some not.

Put two weekends into fishing for surf perch along the coast near Cape Lookout. Both times I got skunked. The conditions seemed right, but even the gear guys were getting nothing. I was using my 7wt two hander to overhand cast a 30′ T-14 to 5′ of flouro with shrimp, minnow and sandcrab patterns. It was a heck of a shoulder workout and I was definitely sore after the first time. The second time out things felt much easier as I got the hang of the two handed overhand cast while wearing a PFD and stripping basket. The best part of the coast those weekends was dodging the high heat in Portland! The time of year isn’t great for surf perch so I’m holding off until they move closer to shore again.

Took one other trip up the Old Clackamas Highway on an exploratory trip with a friend. We took what seemed like an obvious trail down to the water but was more of a rock climbing adventure. After spending some time getting nibbles from small fish and eating our fill of blackberries we got ready to pack it up and head home. I decided to make one last cast into a good looking pool on the way out and got a good hit. A solid 12″ trout! Repeating the mantra “just one more cast then we’ll go” I landed a 10″ on my second cast. On the third, my fly was slammed and I was caught off guard by a 15″ trout. I made one last cast hooking up with another 10″ before respecting my mantra and heading out.

From Dave Kilhefner: Jim Bennett and his trusty dog Bob did well on smallmouth bass last month above Willamette Falls and agreed to show me & George Coutts the ropes. We put our boats in at Hebb Park and worked our way downstream, hitting several of Jim’s favorite spots along the way. Fishing was not hot but it was steady and we all ended up getting several smallmouths. Favorite flies were Clouser Minnows and Woolly Buggers fished on full sinking T-200 lines.

September 2021 Presidents Message

What a difference a year makes! The picture above is of Marty Sheppard scouting for sheep in the smoke during last years wildfires. While our wildfire season is difficult, it’s not as bad as last year, at least in our region.

Here’s some potentially great news! The High Rocks meeting room is open so we will be having a regular “in person” meeting Tuesday, September 21st. Josh Linn will be our speaker and his subject is Euro Nymphing, something he is very knowledgeable about. Josh will be donating a box of flies plus a leader for our raffle.

Our last meeting at High Rocks was February of 2020, about 18 months ago. It’s been a long road!

More on the meeting: given the changing COVID situation I’ll get an email survey out to the membership soon to see how everyone feels about attending an in person meeting.

This month’s Fish A Long will be Saturday, September 25th. The location is still to be determined but with the weather cooling down there are good options are available. The Fish A Longs schedule has its own page on our website. Also, I’m sorry we didn’t have a fish a long in August. To be honest with all the hot weather changing the fisheries, I couldn’t find a place to go that would accommodate a fish a long.

Brad Jonasson want’s everyone to know the Fly Fishing Challenge is still open and to sign up if you haven’t already.

Hoot Owl regulations remain in effect this month.

For several years now we have been posting monthly fishing reports. Looking back on them is a fun way to get ideas for local fly fishing opportunities currently happening or coming up. Type “September” in the search box and you’ll get all the past reports for that month. 

If there is anything you want to see on our blog, let me know. Thanks again to Jim Adams for resuming his fly tying column!

Please remember our sponsors, they are the lifeblood of the club. Stop by their shops and let them know you appreciate their support. Better yet buy something or book a trip. 

Good fishing! 

Dave Kilhefner

July 2021 Fishing Reports

July was a hot one but CFF members were able to get out, keep cool and have some good fishing. Thanks to everyone for contributing your fishing reports!

Here are our July reports; pictures first with the report following. Enjoy!

From Lane Hoffman: Had great rainbow fishing on the Green River in Wyoming.

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From John Silkey: Just did an epic 2 day overnight float on the S. Fork of the Snake! Amazing trip – almost entirely yellowstone cuts in our boat (others also caught rainbows, a few browns, and whitefish.) All of mine were caught either on a giant, foam golden stonefly or a golden stone emerger on a 5 inch dropper.

From Wayne Hughes: Spent a week in Montana. Fished the Clark Fork river near Thompson Falls. Caught lots of Smallmouth bass, Pike, and some nice browns. It was smoky and hot!

From George Coutts: Fished the Deschutes for three days in mid-July. Caught one Rainbow indicator fishing on day one, then six Rainbows Euro Nymphing on day two. Day three was best with two 16” Rainbows Euro Nymphing. Fished Clear Lake at the Fish A Long & managed one trout.

From Gil Henderson: Fished the Deschutes a couple times casting & stripping Sculpin patterns. Caught some nice trout and lost a few too.

From Dennis Murphy: Rhona and I met up late Saturday morning and put in a few hours on the Upper Nestucca. We managed lots of 6-8″ native cutthroats on a variety of patterns, but the winner for me was a rainbow midge. After a bit of that, I started fishing the deepest, strongest riffles I could find and managed to pull up a 12-13″ cutthroat on a size 8 egg sucking leech.We eventually ran into hoot owl hours. Water was in the low 60’s the entire day but we’re all law abiding citizens so we called it a day.

From Greg O’Brien: My wife and daughter joined me on a dory trip with Pacific City Flyfishing.  I’ve been on a trip with them every summer for a while now and it’s always a great time.  Limits of black rockfish and Dungeness crab plus one coho landed out of 4 hooked. 

From David Doble: I can’t believe it but I have no report for July. That’s not good! (note: I personally struggle getting out much in July as well! DK)

From Chris Gardener: Fished up river from Maupin on the Lower D a week ago and put a few in the net with Hopper Dropper & tight line nymphing tactics. Only fished in the AM since it hit 103 in the canyon shortly after lunch but fishing was pretty good overall. Also snagged a Caddis Larva in his mobile home. Pretty cool looking.

From Dave Kilhefner: Vickie Loftus and I hit Schmedeke Pond, mostly for casting practice but I managed a really nice size Crappie. Vickie landed a couple trout while kicking in at the end of the day. Surface water temp was 86 degrees so we released the trout as fast as possible and they quickly dove back into the depths.

From George Krumm: Spent time searching for Chinook in July in the Willamette.  Fishing wasn’t great but there were fish to be found, primarily by trolling Pro-Troll ProChip 11 flashers with size 3.5 spinners with a coon shrimp. Averaged about three bites a day fishing from daylight to 10 a.m.

August 2021 Presidents Message

Great news everyone! The High Rocks meeting room is open so we will be having a regular “in person” meeting September 21st (for our newer members, we don’t have meetings in August as too many of us are out of town). Our last meeting at High Rocks was February of 2020, about 18 months ago. It’s been a long road!

This months Fish A Long will be Saturday, August 21st. The location is still to be determined but given the hot weather it will most likely be on the Columbia or Willamette chasing Smallmouth Bass. The Fish A Longs schedule has its own page on our website.

I’ll get our July fishing reports out soon. As summer progresses hopefully you have been able to beat the heat and enjoy some quality time outdoors. The picture above is my daughter Kelsey kayaking the upper Sandy.

Brad Jonasson want’s everyone to know the Fly Fishing Challenge is still open and to sign up if you haven’t already.

Hoot Owl regulations remain in effect this month.

For several years now we have been posting monthly fishing reports. Looking back on them is a fun way to get ideas for local fly fishing opportunities currently happening or coming up. Type “August” in the search box and you’ll get all the past reports for that month. 

If there is anything you want to see on our blog, let me know. Thanks again to Jim Adams for resuming his fly tying column!

Please remember our sponsors, they are the lifeblood of the club. Stop by their shops and let them know you appreciate their support. Better yet buy something or book a trip. 

Good fishing! 

Dave Kilhefner

July 24th Fish A Long Report

To be honest the catch rate for our July Fish A Long was a little slow. But it’s important to keep the Fish A Long momentum going plus survey’s say you have a better chance at catching fish if you go fishing so that’s what some of use did! Most of us ended up catching a fish or two and having a good time doing it.

Dave K and Kevin R started early on the Salmon River at the Miller Road access. We tried Euro Nymphing in the riffles for about an hour but didn’t find any trout. We did see some salmon rolling in the big pool and this brought back some good fishing memories from my youth. Some history: this area used to be called the Gravel Pit for obvious reasons and it used to be a premier fishing area for Steelhead in Oregon. Back then the Salmon River was heavily stocked and the returns were very good. It wasn’t unusual to see over 100 steelhead in the hole back then. It was such a good spot that former President George H.W. Bush fished there when he came to Oregon (not trying to be political, it’s just something that really happened a long time ago).

If you’ve never been to this place, it’s a well marked pullout about 1/2 mile before the Mt Hood RV Resort. The road is gated and it’s about a 1/2 mile walk in. You need to cover water to score but the wading in the river is a little challenging due to sharp loose rocks and also a fair number of logs & log jams you have scramble around. It’s a beautiful area but also a popular target shooting area so it’s best to hit it early and then move on.

After finishing up on the Salmon River we drove to Clear Lake as we’ve had some good fishing there this year. At the lake we met up with George C, Kadir S and Ken M. There were lots of Callibaetis duns and spinners on the water and fish were rising regularly. Still, the fishing was tough as the lake had gotten very low, the level being about 3,488. You can see from the chart that’s within 3 feet of the maximum drawdown level of 3,485 and later in the day when people started swimming we saw a guy walk all the way across the lake and the water only reached his chest.

One bright spot was that Ken, who has a background in graphic arts, made us a nice sign and had it on display at Clear Lake. We got several inquiries and hopefully they will sign up for our website updates and join us someday.

The usual mid day wind never materialized and it started getting pretty warm, so we got off the water around 1pm and headed to the Frog Lake Sno Park to see if anyone was there to meet for lunch. No one was so several of us finished our day with burgers and refreshments at the Brightwood Tavern, which was a great way to end the day!

Fly Tying July 2021: The Seal Bugger

CFF President Dave Kilhefner has announced that the July 24th fish-a-long will be at various Mt. Hood area lakes.

One of the more effective fly patterns you should have in your stilllwater arsenal is the Seal Bugger, a fly that was developed by Denny Rickards over 30 years ago. Denny is a noted stillwater fly fisherman on his home waters of Upper Klamath Lake in southern Oregon where he developed the Seal Bugger.

Denny thought that he could improve on the longtime favorite versatile fly that we know as the Wooly Bugger. By altering the materials and construction he came up with a fly that is famous for enticing trophy trout which is quite evident if you have ever watched any of his videos or presentations. The Seal Bugger looks much like a classic Wooly Bugger except Rickards’ version uses seal fur (or a substitute) dubbing instead of chenille for the body. Other differences include a reduction in the amount of marabou in the tail and also a reduction in the amount of hackle wraps on the body.

The Seal Bugger can be tied in many color variations. Denny’s own website lists 12 different combinations of tail, body, and hackle colors. Tied usually in sizes 8 and 10 and fished on intermediate sink lines the Seal Bugger is a must-have fly for your arsenal when you are heading out to stillwater fishing locations.

I once saw a list that Denny Rickards made of the flies that he would use if he was only allowed to fish with six flies for the rest of his life. The Seal Bugger was number one on the list!

Dave Kilhefner mentioned to me that Lane Hoffman had been tying seal buggers on euro nymph jig hooks and that they were “awesome”. In verifying that with Lane, he says that he has been tying them on jig hooks and “they have been very effective!”. So I would say that it would be interesting to experiment with wooly buggers compared to seal buggers, compared to jig hook seal buggers. Tie up some of each in your favorite colors and report back to the rest of us about which works best. They are probably fished best with intermediate sink lines, varying the depth and retrieve until you find the right combination.

SEAL BUGGER RECIPE
(for both the Lane Hoffman and Denny Rickards versions)
Hook: For Lane Hoffman’s version use a size 12 or 14 euro nymph jig hook with a 60 degree bend; (For Denny Rickard’s version use a Tiemco 5263, or Mustad 9672, or Daiichi 1720, size 8,10)
Weight: For Lane’s version use a 7/64 or 1/8 inch black slotted tungsten bead; (for Denny’s version use 20 wraps .020 lead).
Tail: marabou (fluffy fibers from the side of the marabou feather will give more movement); tied more sparse than wooly bugger; color of choice (Lane prefers olive); add 2 strands pearl flashabou or flash of choice;
Body: Simi Seal, or equivalent (angora with ice dub); color of choice (Lane prefers olive)
Hackle: 4 wraps saddle hackle; undersized compared to wooly bugger; color of choice (Lane prefers olive or orange)
Rib: small copper wire

SEAL BUGGER TYING INSTRUCTIONS
(for both the Lane Hoffman and Denny Rickards versions)

  1. For Lane’s jigged version, place the slotted bead onto the hook and
    secure it with thread wraps.
  2. For Denny’s standard seal bugger, wind 20 wraps of .020 lead wire
    around shank of hook. The wraps should start about one to two hook
    eye’s width behind the eye of the hook. Secure the lead with numerous
    thread wraps.
    *** Steps 3-12 are the same for both Lane’s jigged seal bugger and Denny
    Rickards standard seal bugger.
  3. Tie in a marabou tail, making it a bit more sparse than for a wooly
    bugger.
  4. Add one piece of pearl flashabou to each side of the tail.
  5. Tie in a piece of copper wire for ribbing at the base of the tail. Leave it
    hanging out back of the fly.
  6. Tie in the saddle hackle feather by the tip at the base of the tail. Leave it
    hanging out the back of the fly.
    ***(Prepare your dubbing material at this time.)
  7. Form about a 5 inch dubbing loop at the base of the tail. Wind your
    bobbin to the front.
  8. Load the dubbing loop sparsely with dubbing material and spin the loop
    tight. Wrap the loaded dubbing loop forward, forming the body of the fly.
    Anchor it with thread wraps at the front.
  9. Wind the hackle forward, making four wraps of the hackle. Anchor the
    hackle at the front of the fly with wraps of thread.
  10. Counterwrap the copper wire ribbing forward, taking care to move the
    wire back and forth to miss the hackle fibers. Anchor the wire with
    thread wraps at the front of the fly.
  11. Whip finish and add head cement.
  12. Pick out body hair fibers with a bodkin, brush, or velcro. Take care to
    not damage the hackle.