CFF Justesen Ranch Fish A Long Report

Another great fish a long is in the books! Last weekend we traveled to the Justesen Ranch Lakes located by Grass Valley. The weather was very nice and the fishing was good and the company even better. Everyone had a very good time.

We stayed in a nice farm house and had a hearty dinner of Sloppy Joes and Ceasar Salad provided by Cheryl Kilhefner. We also had a great apple cake for desert provided by John Warren’s wife Linda. A big thank you to everyone that chipped in with food, snacks and spirits!

The fishing was a mix of hot action at times mixed with periods of selective trout when a different kind of bug started hatching, giving us all a riddle to figure out…or not!

On Sunday the fish went selective on us and while they were jumping everywhere, we could not buy a strike! On this day Trux Dole earned top honors for staying with it and finding the hot fly: a blue damsel dry pattern that the fish absolutely hammered.

For subsurface patterns, most of the time the hot fly was a Red Snow Cone Chironomid fished about six feet under and indictor. When that stopped working casting and stripping green damsel nymphs drew strikes. Green Devils and Callebaetis nymphs also worked well.

This weekend the water temperature was in the mid 60’s producing good damselfly and mayfly activity. And as always, Chironomids were a stillwater staple. Some of the lakes have very clear water and have better dry fly/hatch matching opportunities. Other lakes have a higher nutrient load and while the water isn’t as clear, they have better subsurface fishing as the fish are not as picky. One of the best things is Justesen Ranch offers many lakes to choose from so there is no shortage of water to explore.

June 18th CFF Swap Meet

It’s time for our annual Swap Meet!

We all have rods, reels, fly boxes, tools, etc. that we no longer use or need that we might be willing to trade, sell, or just give away. Someone else in the club might be on the lookout for one of those very items.

You might have an old rod, reel or line that someone might want for a grandchild. Bring ’em!

Maybe you have an old vest or rain jacket that just doesn’t fit well anymore. Bring it!

Perhaps you don’t tie flies anymore but still have some equipment or supplies. Bring ’em!

You probably upgraded something recently and don’t know what to do with your old stuff. Bring it!

We will swap, dicker, barter, buy, and sell. I hope to have time for members to share stories, memories, and tall tales about their fishing experiences. It should be a fun evening and might be the perfect time to bring along a family member or two. See you next Tuesday, June 18th.

May 2019 CFF Fishing Reports

Lot’s of good fishing happens in May and CFF members got out and had good times on the water. Here are their reports:

Lane Hoffman with a bruiser size Rainbow from Rocky Ridge

In early May Lane Hoffman and Jim Romero had good action on large sized rainbows at Rocky Ridge Ranch.

Dave Kilhefner and Chris Obuchowski fished Big Tree Lake at the Oregon Fishing Club. The water temperature had jumped to 64 degrees and the bite was off but they still managed to grind out around a dozen trout in the 12” to 18” range. All the local wildlife was out enjoying the fine spring weather; hunting ospreys, families of geese and even a beaver.

Dave Kilhefner traveled to Kona, Hawaii and caught some strong & interesting looking fish off the rocks.

CFF members Red Smith, Gil Henderson and Carson Taylar made a couple trips to the Deschutes River by Maupin, having good action on Redsides throwing big stonefly dries along undercut banks and under the trees.

Phil Hager spent 9 days camped at Crane Prairie, fishing Crane, Lava and Hosmer. It was windy nearly full time along with rain, hail, snow and even a little sunshine. Most of the days the highs we’re in the 40’s to low 50’s and nights close to freezing. Was it worth it? Rainbows, Cutthroat, Brookies, Browns and even a couple Bass were caught, with many 16″-18″ along with 3-5 pound Rainbows and Brook Trout,

Richard Harvey traveled to Puget Sound and had good action on sea run cutthroats during outgoing tides using baitfish imitation flies.  

Greg O’Brien traveled to Massachusetts and experienced some hot Striper fishing, catching 40+ schoolies on the fly one morning in the bay.  Big fish are coming soon we hope, our biggest was 30”.

Greg O’Brien found this nice brook trout along with several others at Timothy Lake.

Adrian Choate spent two weeks camping on the Deschutes. He had lots of stone fly dry action did do too well on nymphs. He reports at the end of May there are still quite a few bugs still flying and it’s the best stonefly hatch he’s seen in the last several years!

May 25th Fish-A-Long Report

Thank you to everyone who came to this months Fish-A-Long. Also, a double thank you to CFF members Kevin and Joey who did some extra recon over the last couple weekends to help us find the right place to go today and also to Robert Campbell, co-author of Fishing Mt Hood Country, who generously shared his knowledge of this lake.

For several years I’d been hearing good things about Timothy Lake so I was excited to finally get to fish here. On the way to the lake I stopped in at The Fly Fishing Shop where Tony gave me some good advice and hot flies (#8 AP Emerger) that worked all day long.

Even thought the weather was cool and a little windy, all the other stars aligned to make this a great day. The lake had been recently stocked, the water was very clear and 55 degrees; perfect for good trout activity. Everyone caught fish, a couple trout over 20” were landed and to top it all off we saw a pair of eagles teaching their young how do dive bomb the surface of the lake and snag a trout dinner. Richard Harvey did a great job capturing a video.

Fly Tying: May, 2019

The Ice Cream Cone

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Early in my time with Clackamas Fly Fishers I got invited by a group of members to join them on their annual outing to the Owyhee River.  (I’ve got to give a huge shout-out to Ron Bouchard for organizing these trips. The fishing was at times amazing, but the trips getting there were equally memorable. I imagine Ron is still having flashbacks of the lady pulling alongside on the road and informing him that his trailer was on fire!)  

On the second annual trip for me in 2011 we had to change plans because of poor water conditions on the Owyhee and the destination was moved to Diamond Lake.  Pulling in to the parking area, near the area where we ended up camping, we saw huge clouds of mosquitoes in every direction and thought that there was no way that we could survive stepping out of Ron’s pickup, or at the very least we would be needing blood transfusions.  As we set up camp we discovered that what we thought were mosquitoes were actually midges, relatives to mosquitoes, but not of the blood sucking variety. 

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Swarms of Adult Midges

Adult midges are often mistaken for mosquitoes, so if you see a bug that you think is a mosquito, but it is not biting you, it is probably a midge.

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Adult Midge– It’s easy to see how they are mistaken for mosquitoes.

 

It was on this trip that I got my introduction to Ice Cream Cone chironomid patterns.  They were by far the most effective fly for me on the trip. If I had known more about chironomids and how to fish them I would undoubtedly have done even better. The midge hatches were of monumental proportions.  On the second day I was forced to head to shore with my pontoon boat to answer a call of nature. As I approached the shoreline I saw a layer of scum on the water that started about eight feet from the beach.  Upon close examination I could see that the scum was made up of insect shucks, the vast majority of which were chironomids. We were on the windward shore of the lake and the prevailing winds had piled the insect shucks onto the beach to a depth of about four inches. I had experienced some prodigious insect hatches before but nothing like this.

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A mass of chironomid shucks found lining the shoreline of Diamond Lake.

(As an aside… the midge hatch that we experienced at Diamond Lake, although memorable, was apparently minor compared to what happens annually in some areas of the country. In June of 2018, Cleveland had epic midge swarms that were so thick and vast that they were showing up on doppler radar and were described daily on the local TV weather reports!)

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Chironomid Background Info

Midges are small insects with two pair of wings in the order Diptera, along with house flies, mosquitoes, crane flies, and others.  The midges are generally non biters, although a small group of them are called biting midges, another name for the extremely annoying no-see-ums.  Midges go through a complete metamorphosis during their life cycle, that is, from egg to larva to pupa to adult. Fish will also feed on the larva (blood worms) and adults, but for this article we are going to focus on the pupa stage of midges, commonly referred to as chironomids.

 In stillwaters the chironomid pupae are one of the few insects that attract a trout’s attention by moving, not horizontally, but vertically through the water.  However, the movement is not a swimming motion. The pupae slowly rise to the surface as gases form underneath their body segment covering.

Chironomid naturals showing size and color variations.

As it reaches the surface, each pupa will break out of its shuck and work its way through the surface film of the water, emerging as an adult midge.  Getting through the surface tension of stillwater is no small feat for an emerging insect. At times the surface of the water acts like a stretched elastic membrane that provides a real challenge to an emerging insect. Cooler temperatures and windless days seems to enhance the surface tension of water, therefore making it even more difficult for emerging insects, and thus making them more vulnerable to foraging trout. Many anglers report that midge hatches seem to occur during the warmer parts of the day during the winter months, and conversely during the warmer months they occur most often during the cooler parts of the day.

Chironomids are generally curved in shape, so using scud-style hooks, sizes 8 -18, is a good way to imitate them. The bigger sizes would be effective in some alkaline lakes where the midges are famously large, but for most stillwaters you seldom would need anything larger than a size 14.  In streams the chironomids tend to be smaller so some anglers tie their pupa down to size 22 or even smaller, which is tough for those of us that are visually challenged. 

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Using a stomach pump is a good way to figure out what size and color of chironomids to use.

 

 

Chironomids come in a wide range of colors, including black, olive, red, maroon, brown, silver, and others. Nearly all color variations can have some red in them due to some residual hemoglobin that shows through the skin. The body is segmented, with some tyers insisting on having seven segments in the chironomid patterns they tie.  But are the fish really counting? At the head end of the pupa there will be some protruding gill filaments, that can be simulated in artificial fly patterns using any number of white materials like ostrich herl, antron. or poly yarn.

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A chironomid showing very evident wing pads developing and highly visible gill filaments.

The question often comes up about why bother fishing chironomid patterns at all.  Well, midges are available year round. They are arguably the most available food for feeding trout.  What they lack in size is made up for by the sheer numbers that are available. It is estimated that they make up at least 50 percent of the trout’s diet in stillwater habitats. 

Brian Chan, noted stillwater fishing guru, has written extensively on chironomid strategies.  Check out this link for some great advice about fishing chironomids in lakes and ponds:

10 Tips For Success With Stillwater Chironomids by Brian Chan 6/09/2015  on Rio Website

https://www.rioproducts.com/learn/10-tips-for-success-with-stillwater-chironomids

When fishing your chironomids at depths greater than the length of your rod, landing your fish will be made a lot easier by using a “slip strike indicator”.  Here is a helpful short video from In The Riffle:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2cbPXxvxRI

The Ice Cream Cone

If you do some searching on the internet you will find all kinds of chironomid pupa patterns.  And, surely, they all will work. But, as always, simple is a good place to start for a fly tyer. I have found the Ice Cream Cone, also known as the Snow Cone or Sno-Cone, to be both effective and easy to tie. The history of fly patterns is often up for debate, but credit for coming up with the Ice Cream Cone seems to go to Kamloops, B.C. guide Kelly Davidson back in 1992.  There are lots of variations, but the one common identifying feature of an Ice Cream Cone is a white beadhead. Using a white bead, either metal or glass, seems to be acceptable to trout in representing the white gill filaments.

  The body of the flies are often wrapped with thread or super floss, sometimes incorporating other flashy materials like flashabou, frostbite, or krystal flash for some added pop. The amount shine in the pupa body corresponds to gas that builds up in the pupa as it slowly rises through the water column.  At times the chironomids will appear to have an almost chrome-like segmented appearance due to the accumulation of gases.  One of Phil Rowley’s well known chironomid patterns is in fact called the Chromie.

Coating the whole fly with super glue or UV resin, though not essential, will greatly increase its durability and extend the life of the fly. You can fish Ice Cream Cones under an indicator or let them sink near the bottom and then patiently simulate the pupa slowly rising to the surface by using a slower than slow hand-twist retrieve.  When fish appear to be feeding just sub-surface, club member Lane Hoffman likes to grease all of his leader except the last six inches or so, thus leaving the  chironomid pupa pattern suspended just under the surface.  And don’t forget to try midge pupa patterns in streams, too.  Dead drifting them tied off the bend of a larger nymph can be deadly.  When the trout are feeding near the surface of streams, fishing them in a dry-dropper combination can be lots of fun.

Join us at our next CFF Fly Tying Night on Wednesday, May, 29th to tie up some Ice Cream Cones.  They will become an effective addition to your stillwater fishing patterns.  We will be meeting at the Royal Treatment fly Fishing shop in West Linn.  As always, we get underway at 6:00 pm.  Hope to see you there!

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CFF Auction for May

Euro nymphing is all the rage. So we have an opportunity for all you raging CFF members – a custom built 10′, 4 wt nymphing rod!

As a byproduct of the CFF rod building class, member John Warren donated his rod kit for George Coutts to finish building as a club auction item.

Details: 10’, 4 piece, 4wt, Euro Nymphing rod,  PacBay blank (gloss black), maroon thread wraps. (George reports the total rod weight is only 3.5 oz.)

“GLOSS BLACK – THE PACBAY Quickline series of rod blanks is lighter and more sensitive than anything they have offered before, providing premium performance and craftsmanship to rod builders who require the very best.  In addition to some time-honored lengths and actions, there are also application specific models offered as well.  Try one yourself and see why Quickline is the flagship of our rod blank lineup.”

This auction will run until Monday, May 20 at 5:00 p.m. and is open to paid up CFF members only. To make a bid go to Auctions. If you have any questions please contact me at bartschp@gmail.com.

Kyle Tidwell May 21st Speaker

Student Biologist Kyle Tidwell studies Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) in Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Washington. © Michael Durham / www.DurmPhoto.com

Kyle is a PhD working at the US Army Corp of Engineers Fish Field Unit. His presentation will be on the Fish Predators on the Columbia Basin, focusing on Avian and Pinniped management and research. It will be a very informative presentation you won’t want to miss!

Meeting details: https://clackamasflyfishers.org/meetings-events/