February 20th Speaker: Mark Bachmann

Mark Bachmann of The Fly Fishing Shop will be CFF’s guest speaker Tuesday, February 20th.

Mark’s presentation will be on growing trend of Trout Spey Fishing: Learn about the flies, tackle and techniques used in Spey Rod fishing for Western Trout. It will be a great presentation you won’t want to miss!

Meeting details: https://clackamasflyfishers.org/meetings-events/

The Fly Fishing Shop  http://flyfishusa.com/

President’s Message February 2018

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We have a great month coming up with a well known speaker and a fun fish-a-long.  Notwithstanding that we just finished a great fish-a-long on the Sandy River with at least 12 people attending.

First, I would like to Thank our member Ron Lauzon for arranging the site and then assisting further by sharing his casting expertise with members. Also, a Thank You Dave Kilhefner and his wife were gracious  hosts providing a delicious lunch for the attendees.  Everyone who attended it complimented the event.

Last month our speaker was Nick Rowell who spoke to us on winter Steelhead fishing. Nick had a great presentation with many practical ideas about how to you be a success in catching these wily creatures.

This month it is exciting to welcome our one and only Founding Gold Sponsor, Mark Bachmann, owner of the Fly Fishing Shop in Welches Oregon. In addition Mark is an accomplished guide, fly tyer, and author who will be sharing with us a new topic.  He will be speaking on Trout Spey Fishing which should be of interest to about everyone who enjoys Trout fishing. It will be interesting to be exposed to another way to fish for them successfully.  Do not miss this presentation.

As it is now Steelhead season our major door prize will be a seat on Mark’s drift boat for a float trip on the Sandy River. This always a fun trip and some lucky person will join the winner of our online auction on the trip.  Good Luck!!!

A couple of events that are coming up shortly. First the Fly Fishing Film tour will be at the Aladdin Theater on 2/10/18. Tickets are available at Royal Treatment Fly Shop and Northwest Fly Fishing Outfitters as well as online at the Fly Fishing Film Tour.  We also have a fly tying event at the Fly Fishing Shop on Saturday 2/10/18 where they will be concentrating on tying Streamer patterns. Next the Sportmen’s Show on 2/7-11/18 at the Portland Expo Center which does have some fly fishing exhibits and programs. Finally, the N W Fly Tyer & Fishing Expo will be coming up on March/9-10/18 in Albany Oregon. It hosts a large number of fly tyers as well as equipment vendors, instructors for casting and techniques.

Remember our sponsors as they allow us to bring you our activities and speakers.  Drop in a say hi, better yet buy something or book a trip with them as they appreciate our support.

 

Gil Henderson

 

Sandy River Trip Guided by Mark Bachmann on 3/22/18

You will be bidding on one (1) seat on a guided steelhead trip on the Sandy River with Mark Bachmann.  The trip is scheduled for Thursday, March 22, 2018.  NOBODY knows the Sandy like Mark and the folks at The Fly Fishing Shop in Welches!  This is usually one of our most popular and competitive auctions of the year.  This auction ends Tuesday, Feb. 20 at 5 p.m.

The other seat will be raffled off at the February CFF meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 20.  So… you can take your chances then OR ensure your seat by winning this auction!

To find out more about the auction or to make a bid go to the AUCTIONS tab on the black bar Home menu above (Or just push that cute colored “auctions” button.) and you should be all set!

Let me know if you have questions.  bartschp@gmail.com

(This is our first attempt at putting up an auction on the new 
website.  I ask for your patience if it's not mistake proof!)

Fly Tying: February, 2018

The Muddler Minnow

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Back in October the guest speaker at our club’s meeting was Kevin Erickson who gave us a fine presentation that centered on his new book, “Feather Craft: The Amazing Birds and Feathers Used In Classic Salmon Flies”. It was readily apparent to most of us that we have neither the skills nor the patience to produce the quality of flies that Kevin is crafting.  Amazing stuff! (I clearly remember him saying that the completion of a Jock Scott fly required 32 different materials. Whew!) At the conclusion of his talk Kevin graciously offered to come to one of our Fly Tying Nights to lend us a hand in improving our fly tying skills. After explaining to Kevin that our tyers are not quite ready for classic salmon flies, we decided to focus on the Muddler Minnow as a fly that would teach us some new skills that haven’t yet been emphasized in our monthly fly tying sessions.

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Although perhaps not as in favor as it once was, the Muddler Minnow, or Muddler as it is commonly called, is still the“go to” fly of some flyfishers and the Muddler should occupy a spot in your fly box. I have come across a few testimonials to the effectiveness of  the Muddler. At a fly shop I met a gentleman that has had terrific success fishing only Muddlers, in various colors, for steelhead on the Deschutes. And famed flyfisher and author Gary Lafontaine is said to have only fished Muddlers in a variety of forms and sizes for one year and reported that he had landed as many fish as if he had fished his usual array of patterns. And the historical importance of the fly to the tradition of fly fishing in this country was emphasized in 1991 when the US Postal Service included the Muddler Minnow as one of only five flies in its fly fishing stamp series.

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The Muddler Minnow has played an important part in my fly tying history as it was the first fly that I ever watched being tied. My dad, brother Steve, and I were fishing at Diamond Lake when I was probably 10 and my brother was 8 years of age. A hot tip told us that a couple of fly patterns were very productive late in the day. We wandered over to the resort and found an elderly gentleman outside tying flies and selling them as fast as he could tie them.  We were both fascinated watching the man fashion Muddler Minnows and another pattern from miscellaneous materials sitting on his fly tying bench. We purchased a few and had great success fishing the flies on a very slow troll far behind the boat on unweighted monofilament line using spinning rods, with the fishing getting better and better the darker it got late in the evening. (Fishing flies in this manner was a welcome relief after trolling Ford Fender flashers around all day.) I guess there is reason to think that the same success could be had at Diamond and other lakes, using a flyrod and a Muddler Minnow some 60 years later. At least it ought to be worth a try.

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The Muddler Minnow was first tied by Don Gapen of Anoka, Minnesota back in 1937 for use in pursuing brook trout on the Nipigon River in Ontario. Gapen’s family ran a couple of fishing resorts and Don later started the Gapen tackle company that is still a family owned business today. Their online catalog shows that they still carry the Muddler Minnow but they also have some lure offerings with intriguing names such as the Ugly-Bug, the Bait-Walker, and the Walk-N-Lizard. It looks like a lot of their products are aimed at the pike and muskie fishers in their area.

When you look at the original Muddler Minnows you will notice that they are kind of scraggly, almost messy looking, compared to what we commonly see in fly boxes today. The heads of Don Gapen’s Muddlers were largely left untrimmed as is seen in the photos below.

It is interesting to note that the Gapen family today still sells Muddler flies that resemble the original version and have testimonials that state that they fish just fine. One reviewer says, “Just like movies, the original is usually the best. I tie and fish both original and modern muddlers and found the original out performed the modern on many occasions.” A lot of us that tie flies today like them to look nice and neat in our fly boxes. Maybe we are trying to tie for ourselves and not for the fish.

Credit for the appearance of today’s Muddlers generally goes to famed Montana tyer and flyfisher Dan Bailey. The dense and neat heads that he developed back in the 1950’s require a process of spinning and packing the deer hair, followed by a trimming done with scissors or a razor blade. Muddlers today typically employ mottled turkey quill segments for the tail and wings and gold or silver mylar for the body. Often there is an underwing of squirrel hair and a collar of deer hair. The variations and colors of Muddlers today is limited only by the tyer’s imagination, but the one thing that all Muddlers will have in common is a head of spun deer hair. A densely packed head provides plenty of flotation but the flies can be tied weighted or unweighted according to the targeted species and water conditions.

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Some Variations of Muddler Minnows

From its name the Muddler Minnow will mimic a variety of small “minnow” fish like shiners, chubs, and dace. Weighted and fished along the bottom the muddler is a great sculpin or tadpole imitation. But the Muddler is a versatile fly that is said to mimic a variety of other life forms like grasshopper and crickets. Tied in a variety of sizes, Dan Bailey often used the Muddler as a late summer grasshopper imitation on his favorite Montana rivers.

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A Muddler Minnow Variation Called A “Spuddler”

Nothing can be ruled out when deciding what is the proper way to fish a Muddler. Quick and irregular strips may be effective at times, but on some days and for some fish a simple down and across swing may be just the ticket. Gary Lafontaine reported that while a retrieve using rapid wild strips was effective for bass, a smooth strip with less action was much more effective for trout. Unweighted Muddlers can be very effective as a waking fly for steelhead while a weighted pattern fished at or near the bottom using rests between short strips can be a fine sculpin imitation. So it sounds like anything goes when fishing a Muddler. Good advice is probably “If what you are doing is not working, try something different.”

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Take advantage of having Kevin Erickson on hand for our next Fly Tying Night. Join us at the Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn on Wednesday, Feb. 28th for an evening of hair spinning, packing and trimming. As always we will be getting started at 6:00 pm sharp.
Hope to see you there!

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