May 16 Speaker – Dave Kilhefner

Dave Kilhefner will be the CFF’s guest speaker Tuesday, May 16th. Dave will present “Fly Fishing Hacks—Small Shortcuts to Big Success.”

We are also having a small Fly Tying Materials Swap so don’t forget to bring your surplus materials and equipment. We will have some tables set up to display everybody’s goods starting at 6:00 pm.  Please clearly mark your materials with your name and what your intention is for your materials (swap, sell, give away, etc.).  We will try to have all of the swapping, selling, and donating completed in time for the meeting’s starting time of 7:00 pm.

We will also have another chance to sign up for our Fly Fishing Challenge. 25 members have already done so – some have already recorded their first catch from April’s fish-along at Rainier Lakes. Most streams open May 22nd.  It’s free, easy and rewarding (patch and certificate). Start the season off by embracing the Challenge.

It will be a great meeting you won’t want to miss!

Meeting details: https://clackamasflyfishers.org/meetings-events/

CFF Library Additions

Below is a list of books donated by Jim Coulthurst, the CFF founder who spoke at the April meeting. We now have close to 200 books. I only bring two boxes of mostly newer books plus most DVDs to the meetings. Let me know if you want to check out any of the books below. Contact me if you would like the updated list of our library materials.

Joan Wulff Joan Wulff’s Fly Fishing: Expert Advice from a Woman’s Perspective
Joan Wulff Joan Wulff’s Fly Casting Techniques
Lee Wulff Lee Wulff on Flies
Skip Morris Fly Tying Made Clear and Simple
Skip Morris Tying Foam Flies
Jack Dennis Western Trout Fly Tying Manual
Jack Dennis Western Trout Fly Tying Manual, Volume II
Al Caucci, Bob Nastasi Fly-tyer’s Color Guide
Al Caucci, Bob Nastasi Hatches: a complete guide to fishing the hatches of north american trout streams
Rick Hafele, Dave Hughes The Complete Book of Western Hatches
Paul Jorgensen Modern Trout Flies and how to tie them
Darrel Martin Fly-Tying Methods
Trey Combs The Steelhead Trout: Life History and Angling Techniques
Sylvester Nemes The Soft-Hackled Fly Addict

And the Dream Lives On, Part 3

This is the May edition of the auction we started in March.  It’s the same situation:   You will be bidding on one (1) seat of four on a 2 day, 2 night jet boat trip on the Lower Deschutes River in late October 2017 with host/guide Mark Bachmann!  This trip is sponsored by The Fly Fishing Shop in Welches. Each seat is valued at $1000.

2 of the seats are already taken and we will auction off the last seat next month. Each seat has gone for over $650 so far.  The interest is high!

Bidding is open only to CFF members.  MIMINUM BID $400.  BUY IT NOW FOR $1000.

To make a bid send an email to bartschp@gmail.com

Be sure to include 

Your full name. 

Your bid. 

Your phone number. 

The email will be time stamped so I  will have them in correct order. In case of a tie, the earliest time stamped bid wins.

Auction ends at 5:00 pm on Tuesday, May 16.

Let me know if you have questions.  Phil B. 971-235-0724

Fly Tying: May, 2017

The Parachute Adams

Parachute-Adams-Fly-Tying-Video

Parachute Adams

One of our older and more productive dry fly patterns is The Adams. I may be biased, but I feel that it has a great name. And more than once I have told fishing friends that it was invented by a relative of mine. You know your storytelling material is getting low when you run out of “fishing lies” and have to start telling “fly tying lies”. But, in reality, a fellow by the name of Len Halladay is credited with the creation of The Adams back in 1922. So perhaps you are wondering why it is not called “The Halladay”? Well, one story goes that Halladay came up with the idea of the fly as a general purpose mayfly imitation. He tied the fly and then gave it to his friend Charles Adams who first fished it on the Boardman River in Michigan and spoke highly of the success he had with it. So instead of naming his creation after himself, Halladay chose to name it after his friend Adams. Another story says that Adams came up with the idea for the fly and had Halladay tie it to his specifications. Either way, as they say, the rest is history. Since 1922 The Adams has been one of the most effective and popular dry flies in the world.

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Classic Up-wing Adams

The classic Adams fly is tied with a gray body, upright wings, and usually with both grizzly and brown hackles. It is said to be an impressionistic pattern that can represent many grayish and brownish mayflies as well as other insects. It is often a good searching fly to use. According to Scott Richmond in his book Fishing In Oregon’s Best Fly Waters, the Adams is seldom the exact “right” fly, but it is rarely the “wrong” fly to use.

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Adams Wulff

The original Adams fly has been modified into a number of variations over the years, including the Adams Irresistible, the Adams Wulff, the Adams Loop Wing, the Adams Hairwing Dun, and the Adams Humpy. But the most popular variation is The Parachute Adams , the pattern that we will be tying at this month’s Fly Tying Night. The skills we practice in tying the Parachute Adams can translate to other parachute patterns. In his book Tying Dry Flies, Randall Kauffmann describes fifteen other parachute dry fly patterns, that includes the Parachute Ant, the Parachute Black Gnat, the Parachute Baetis, the Parachute PMD, the Parachute Green Drake, and others. So once you master the skill of tying the parachute wing of the Parachute Adams you will be ready to experiment with other parachute patterns.

Thanks to our club librarian, Carson Taylor, for forwarding some interesting information regarding parachute patterns and why they are so effective. Apparently, in author Gary Borger’s opinion, the Parachute Adams should be best considered as the ultimate emerger pattern, and not an adult dun or spinner pattern. The profile of the Parachute Adams, and other parachute patterns, sitting low in the water are viewed by the fish as  insects struggling to emerge through the surface film. For more details regarding emerging insects see Carson for Gary Borger’s book Fishing The Film (2010).

adams irres.

Adams Irresistible

The first parachute stye fly may have been tied by a Scottish lady named Helen Todd back in the early 1930’s. She is said to have used a boar’s bristle as a “mast” around which she wound the hackle. Her idea was taken further by others and special hooks with a built-in “mast” at a right angle to the hook shank were produced.

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A Hardy hook from the 1930’s with a built-in “mast”.  These fell out of favor because of the increased weight.

A patent was taken out in 1933 and the first parachute style flies were sold as “gyroflies”. Improvements were made over the years and today the unique horizontal hackle of the parachute is wound around an upright wing or “post”. The horizontal hackle allows the fly to land upright in the water and float in the surface film. The horizontal hackle fibers on the water apparently make a good imitation of the legs of an insect and also provide more buoyancy than hackle that is wound vertically. White calf tail was once the most common post material but today synthetic materials like poly yarn are often used. The post material really increases the visibility of the fly. As any angler knows, it is really easy to lose track of the location of a small fly on the water, especially in low light conditions. And that is especially true with an Adams fly that is mostly gray/brown in color. So the post of a parachute fly becomes a big asset in tracking the fly in the water. Despite the visibility to us, post materials don’t seem to deter fish from taking the flies. In fact some anglers prefer Parachute Adams flies tied with  a post using hi-visability colors like pink, orange, or chartreuse.

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Hi-Vis Parachute Adams

Our next Fly Tying Night will be Wednesday, May 24th. We will be meeting at The Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn to tie up some Parachute Adams flies. This pattern would be suitable for tyers with at least a moderate amount of experience. It would not be a good fly for your first ever fly tying experience. Our Royal Treatment friends will have tools to loan out for the evening. We’ll be starting at 6pm. Hope to see you there!

Rocky Ridge Ranch Report

The Rocky Ridge Lakes have some very big trout and the best time to get one of these pigs is when they are active for a short time before dawn. I arrived at the main lake at 6:30 to find Jim Adams fighting his second of two big trout; both were hooked on Chironomids.

That got the blood pumping so I quickly got into my float tube, kicked out of the shallows and started fishing with Chironomids as well. I got a couple average size trout, then the sun came up and the bite slowed.

Today the weather was clear with some high clouds. This place is famous for wind and there is really cool breeze blowing, but fortunately it’s not blowing too hard. The sun is up early this time of year and after our long winter this catches me by surprise. The water temperature was 56° with about 4 feet of clarity.

I tried several different Chironomid patterns and they just don’t seem to be working the way they should. After an hour or so of experimenting with different Chrironomid patterns and presentation styles with little to show for it I go in a completely different direction and tie on a Green Devil, which is basically a 1/32nd oz micro jig; green in color with an orange head. A fish grabbed it on the first cast! The fish are on this fly and by lunch it is mangled beyond repair.

It’s now closing in on lunchtime and needing more Green Devils, I kick in, set up my vice and tie 5 more. Then Lane cooks up some good burgers and we dine overlooking the lake. Full and tired, it was time for a siesta. Got back out on the lake at 2:30 and caught 4 trout on my first 5 casts! This fast action held up through the rest of the afternoon. Back on shore at the end of the day we were all smiles and agreed the fishing today had been epic. The hot flies were green toned leeches and woolly buggers. Carson got a steelhead sized fish on a Chironomid down by the earth dam.

Paul and Henry went down to the lower lake and had excellent action as well. The Rocky Ridge lakes have all been recently stocked and fishing is very good.

http://rockyridgeranchoregon.com/

President’s Message May 2017

It is time to really get out their and hit the water things are starting to look up.  The weather is starting to cooperate and streams are slowly getting into shape. More fun to come.

Our April speaker was John Smeraglio, owner of the Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop, who gave us great information on spring Trout fishing on the Deschutes. Things are a little different this year with water levels being high and the temperature cooler, but fish can still be  caught. The Salmon Fly hatch is just around the corner, but may be later than the last couple of years.

Our scheduled speaker for May had a last minute opportunity to fish in Baha, Mexico. No sane person would turn this down so Dave Kilhefner will be filling in to share some ideas, techniques and insights to fish our local waters and beyond.

The last fish-a-long was at them Oregon Fishing club’s  Rainier Lakes and from the report it looked as if all had a good time. Some nice fish were held up for the camera.

The next fish-a-long will be on 5/20/17 at the Rocky Ridge Lakes.  This is usually a great outing with everyone catching and releasing some gorgeous Trout.   Make sure you attend this event as it can be great fun.  More information is on the blog.

Coming up very quickly is the Sandy River Spey Clave at  Oxbow park.  It is put on by The Fly Fishing Shop ,Welches Oregon, and gathers a great list of presenters to assist in improving your Spey fishing. In addition representatives from equipment manufacturers are present with the latest in gear.  It is on Saturday 5/12-13/17 so make a point to attend.  More information available at flyfishusa.com

Remember our sponsors by visiting their shops when you are in their area. Stop in and purchase something, book a trip, or just say hello and thank them for their support.

Gil Henderson

Rocky Ridge Fish a Long 5-20-17

It is time again for our annual fish a long at Rocky Ridge Ranch. This is one of the few events that the club has where there is a limit on the number of people.  This year we are only going to have the lakes on Saturday with a limit of 10 people.

If you have not fished these lakes in the past it is something you should not miss. The ranch is located in Central Oregon and is about 40 miles south of The Dalles so the weather should be great. The lakes are well stocked with large trout for catch and release fishing. This is your opportunity to get into a real monster.

The cabin is available for both Friday and Saturday evening for $30 per person. There is a limit of 6 people so let me know if you are interested in spending the evening.

The fishing is limited to 10 anglers and we currently have 7 people signed up.

The cost for fishing these private lakes is usually $135 but with your club membership the cost is $100.

Please get your payment to Paul Brewer prior to the 20th

The club will provide a light breakfast as well as lunch on Saturday.

If you have any questions contact Paul Brewer ponzdog@icloud.com

Directions:  VIEW IN GOOGLE MAPS

Rainier Lakes Fish-A-Long Report

First a BIG THANKS to the Oregon Fishing Club for letting us fish the Rainier Lakes this weekend!

We met at 8am in the Tualatin Cabela’s parking lot then convoyed to the lakes, which took about 90 minutes. We had some heavy rain during the drive and it was starting to look like more of the rain gear test than a fishing trip. Fortunately when we arrived at the lake the rain had tapered off and we could see fish rising as we geared up—a good sign for sure!

This year the lake had been stocked with a good number of large size Albino Rainbow Trout. They really show up in the water, making for some interesting sight fishing. But, these albino trout are very finicky. Even when you do everything right they mostly just follow your fly without taking, but it really gets your heart racing.

Everyone caught fish today and one club member caught his biggest rainbow ever!  Most of the trout we caught were healthy rainbows in the 14 to 20+ inch range.

The hot flies were dark colored Chironomid patterns in size 12 & 14. Both indicator and sink & slow retrieve presentations worked. Later in the day the Chironomid bite died and the trout started hitting woolly buggers with green patterns being the most successful.

We had intervals of rain, sun, wind throughout the day; it was typical crazy spring weather!

The water temperature of the lake was 52 degrees. The water had a nice green tint with about 4 feet of visibility.

This was another fun Fish-A-Long. Thanks to everyone for coming!

   

Great Day on the Sandy-April 10, 2017

Ris Bradshaw and myself were the lucky winners of the float trip on the Sandy River donated by the FLY FISHING SHOP in Welches. The trip was guided by Mark Bachmann and he put together a enjoyable trip that took us from Dodge Park to Dabney Park. The river was in good shape and surprisingly with little pressure.  Mark put us on some great water, had brimming hot coffee , hot lunch prepared by his wife Patty Barnes, as well as sharing his intimate knowledge of the Sandy River and of course Steelhead fishing.

To top it all off Ris landed two nice Steelhead and I had one on for a few shakes before it waived goodbye.  The weather was mixed but all in all very comfortable with the right equipment. No one fell in and we fished hard until late in the afternoon. It was certainly a memorable trip for all of us.

Again, thanks to Mark for donating the trip and for being such a consistently strong supporter of Clackamas Fly Fishers.

CFF Fly Fishing Challenge

This 2017 season the club is sponsoring a new program (Fly Fishing Challenge) to promote Pacific Northwest fisheries and to encourage membership participation in the many fly fishing opportunities this region offers.  Every club member is eligible to register at no cost for the Challenge to catch any salmonoid species from (1) a lake, (2) a river, and (3) a stream during the 2017 fishing season, and to notate the catch on a card (received at registration) for submission to the club once the challenge has been fulfilled.  Pictures are encouraged if taken without harm to the catch.  Participants successfully completing the Challenge will be awarded a Certificate of Achievement and a patch for their vest at the next membership meeting. (More information will be available at the April club meeting.)