CFF Member Auction – Hatch Finatic 9 Plus Reel

Hatch Finatic 9 Plus

This is a top line, heavy duty reel for the salt water or spey fisherman.  It is USA made from Type 2 anodized aluminum for line weights 9-11. As the Hatch website describes it … “a reel that has the look, feel and performance of a Ferrari!”

Donated by Northwest Flyfishing Outfitters this reel retails for $790.  This auction is open to paid up CFF members only!

To make a bid or to follow the action go to the Auctions section.

Let me know if you have any questions. bartschp@gmail.com

Second Annual Fly Fishing Symposium and Taco Bar at Barton Park

 

CFF sponsor Royal Treatment Fly Fishing will be hosting their Second Annual Fly Fishing Symposium and Taco Bar at Barton Park on Sunday, October 14th from 10:00 to 4:00.

CFF will have a booth to hang out & help with casting & fly tying. Make plans to join us for a full day of fly fishing fun!

  • Where: Barton Park on the Clackamas River ($5 park entry fee)
  • When: Sunday, October 14th from 10 to 4
  • What: Casting demos, Wading clinics, tying demos, entomology displays, kids casting and fly tying, Spey clinics and more. A full day dedicated to fly fishing.
  • Meet factory reps and test cast the latest rods from Sage, Winston, CF Burkhiemer, Scott, G.Loomis and Echo.
  • Participate in the 5wt shootout.
  • Learn about fly lines and test the latest offerings from Airflo, Rio and Scientific Anglers.
  • Hang out at the Bug Boat and learn about bugs with Rick Hafele and the Deschutes River Alliance.
  • Enter the Korkers Toe Jam Boot Toss for your chance to when a pair of Korker Boots.
  • Enjoy our world-famous free Tembo Tusk Taco Bar.  Please register here

Justesen Lakes Fishing Report

Paul Brewer and Dave Kilhefner fished some of the Justesen Ranch Lakes (there are a lot of them!) this past weekend (Oct 6 and 7). After fishing Saturday we stayed at the Shaniko Lake cabins. Besides being a nice place to stay, we were right next to several good trout lakes that we fished on Sunday. It’s a nice setup and we are planning a Fish-A-Long there in the spring.

Fishing was good for rainbow trout in the 14 to 20 inch range and we each landed 20+ trout both days. The two best tactics were casting & stripping/twitching Green Devils and fishing Chironomids under an indicator about 6’ deep.

We did a stomach pump and found dragon & damsel nymphs along with chironomid larva & pupa.

You need a float tube to fish these lakes as much of the shoreline is surrounded by cattails. It was chilly with a cool breeze blowing both days so layers of warm clothing were a must. The water temps at the lakes ran from 50 to 55 degrees and the water was very clear.

Besides good fishing, we had good wildlife viewing and saw lots of deer and turkeys.

Fly Tying: October, 2018

The Chum Salmon Slammer

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It has been a club tradition for a number of years to head to the coast for our November Fish-A-Long where we go after Chum Salmon. It is hoped that by our November 10 outing we will have received enough rain (but hopefully not too much!) to draw these fish into our coastal rivers. The Kilchis River is our normal destination, although the Miami River also has a run of chums. If you have some extra time this fall, there are many more opportunities to catch chum salmon in Washington waters. In fact, the WDFW website has a note indicating that Chum salmon are the most abundant wild salmon species in Washington state. Be sure to check out the Washington regulations if you are planning to head up there.

Chum Salmon– Ocean Phase                       Chum Salmon– Spawning Male

Chum salmon are sometimes regarded as the “ugly stepsister” of all of the species of Pacific salmon. They can be chrome bright while still in the ocean but soon begin to develop characteristic markings as they prepare to enter freshwater. After entering rivers chums are readily identifiable by their characteristic olive green coloration with purplish vertical striping and blotches along their sides. Chum salmon are sometimes referred to as dog salmon, with research showing two possible origins for that name. One explanation is that name comes from the impressive mouthful of sharp teeth seen in the males as they approach spawning time. A second explanation is that the reference to dog salmon comes from the habit of Native Americans feeding the flesh of the chum salmon to their dogs. Chums are not known for their aerial acrobatics but they fight like bulldogs and are not brought in easily, so don’t go light in selecting your gear.

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Spawning males have impressive teeth!  Carry appropriate pliers!

This month we will be tying up a fly called The Chum Salmon Slammer. Rich Youngers, formerly of the Creekside Angling Fly Shop in Salem, is credited with coming up with the design for this fly. The name of the fly indicates that it was designed specifically for chum salmon but there is no reason to think that it would not be effective for any of the species of Pacific salmon, as well as steelhead. The fly is normally tied in chartreuse. There is an old saying in regard to chum salmon… “it’s no use if it ain’t chartreuse”, regardless of the specific fly pattern. However, many anglers report that if the chums aren’t responding to chartreuse flies it is time to switch to something that is hot pink. So hopefully, we will have both the time and materials to tie up both chartreuse and pink “Slammers”. And if something happens with the weather and it messes with the Kilchis Fish-A-Long, all is not lost, as these flies can also be used as dandy steelhead patterns.

Join us at the Royal Treatment Fly Shop in West Linn on Wednesday, October 24. Even if you are not planning to attend the Kilchis River fish-a-long the Chum Salmon Slammer would be a fly to have in various colors in your steelhead fly box. We’ll see you at 6 pm !

President’s Message October 2018

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We are off and running after our summer break.  First, I would like to acknowledge a member who volunteered to take over the role of Membership Director. Please join me in welcoming Gregg O’Brien  as our new board member responsible for the development and managing our membership.  Gregg has already working with Red Smith to make this a smooth transition.  Catch him at an upcoming meeting and give him a pat on the back for stepping up.  Thanks Gregg!!!

Our speaker last month was Frank Day from the Fly Fishing Shop, our one and only Founding Gold Sponsor, who spoke to us on fishing Mount Hood waters.   He covered trout fishing in the streams in and around the Sandy River with information on access, species, flies, and equipment.  Saw many members taking notes and asking many questions.  A good alternative fishery close to the metro.

Next we welcome Scott Richmond to share with us his Magic Fly Box.  Scott is well renowned in the Northwest fly fishing scene with a number on reference books on the Deschutes, a novel set on the river and of course the creation and management of Westfly, an informative fly fishing website.  You do no want to miss his presentation.

The September fish-a-ling on the Deschutes River was not very well attended.  Those that did attend reported fun trout fishing even though Steelhead fishing was slow. In addition Dave Kilhefner’s wife Cheryl made a great spaghetti lunch for the attendees.   Thank You Cheryl.

This month we are planning to go to Timothy Lake for trout.  More information will be coming soon so mark your calendar for Saturday 10/20/18.

Do not forget our sponsors as they are the lifeblood of our club. Stop by their shops to say hello and thank them for their support. Better yet buy something or book a trip to really underscore our gratitude for their support.

Gil Henderson

CFF September Fishing Reports

September was a good month to go fly fishing! Here’s some reports from our members and supporting members:

Randy Clark of the Bridgeport Orvis store caught this nice bull trout on the Metolius River along with a few browns, a brookie, some whitefish and a pile of redsides for “the Metolius super slam.” Great job Randy!

In mid September Dave Kilhefner fished the Deschutes River mouth and saw two steelhead taken by fly anglers plus a spin angler landed a 20+ pound salmon. The next day he had his first trip Kayak Fishing for Smallmouth bass near Mitchell Island on the Columbia River. The weather and wind cooperated and it was a great morning on the water with about a dozen smallmouth brought to hand. The bass averaged about 2lbs  and a couple were 3lbs.

David Mullins caught a half dozen 10″ to 12″ trout up the Clackamas near the Memaloose Bridge. They were taking dry flies; #14 Caddis with green or white bodies, and also a Red Humpy.

Phil Hager had a great trip to Central Oregon. On 9/19-9/21 he fished Fall River. A Midge nymph and a Tied Down Caddis, presented subsurface on a floating or an intermediate sinking line did the trick for Rainbows 8″ on up to 18″ and also Brookies  6″ to 9″ in size.

On 9/22 Phil fished Odell Creek (flows into Davis Lake): Same flies but only on a floating line and caught Rainbows up to 20″, but mostly 12″ or less.

Hosmer Lake was on the menu for 9/24. A Midge nymph and Pheasant Tail fished on and  intermediate line accounted for some nice Rainbows (1 @ 3 lbs and 1 @ 4.5 lbs) plus others in varying sizes, Brookies from about 12″ to 16″, Cutthroat and CutBows in the same size range. The water temp is changing and fish were moving down the channel to lower section.

Lava Lake was good on 9/25. Despite reports from everyone with fish finders saying all the fish were near the bottom, Phil lost count on Rainbows and Kokanee in about 2 hours of fast fish. An intermediate line with either a Brick Leech or TMC Nymph was the ticket (Leech size 10 3xl & TMC size 16).

John Warren stayed a couple extra days after the Deschutes River Fish-A-Long, fishing around Maupin. He continued to do well Euro Nymphing, with small dark Euro Nymphs working best. He even hooked a big fish that broke him off!

Carey Allison fished the Clackamas several times this month and had good success. He took 2 steelhead on surface presentations; both in the same hole but on different days. Also, he saw lots of steelhead holding in tailouts as well. Later in the month he floated with a buddy from Barton to Riverside; they didn’t find any steelhead but we ran into a massive drake hatch, which brought some of the rare Clackamas Sea Run Cutthroat out to play. He took two over 16″ in size was swinging  a size 6 moose hair caddis pattern just sub surface. Those SRC are crazy strong for their size, both fish tearing line and making his farlex scream. They also jump like crazy! Loads of fun.

One word of warning…while stepping out of the bottom of one of his favorite holes at dusk, on the lower Clack below Carver, Carey saw a cougar hanging out on the trail  used to walk back to his truck! Never thought we’d be seeing cougars anywhere below Carver!!

Mark Bachmann of The Fly Fishing Shop fished several clients downstream from Mack’s Canyon from September 10-20. Fishing wasn’t red hot, but they did get a few steelhead most every day.

Smallish darker flies worked best and water conditions were and are perfect for floating line fishing. Now that the nets are out of the Columbia, fishing should be even better!

Here’s a video link to go with Mark’s pictures: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xflbCqsCp4U

Ed Rabinowe had a very successful outing on the Lower Columbia River around St Helens before the salmon closure.

Nice job everyone!

Sept 22nd Fish A Long Report

Thanks to everyone who came to the Deschutes River Fish-A-Long this weekend plus extra thanks to Paul Brewer for organizing and Cheryl Kilhefner for the wonderful food. We had a great time, here’s a recap:

The river was in perfect shape; clear water and 57 degrees. The weather was good too, overcast in the morning improving to partly cloudy in the afternoon with a high of 72 degrees. The only bad weather were some strong wind gusts around mid-morning but fortunately they didn’t last more than a few minutes each.

Several of us camped at Beavertail and the campground was nearly full. Most of the angling pressure was directed at steelhead and the reports were the steelhead were a little scarce this weekend. Still, there were a few hookups but none from our group. Trux did get a “San-Diego Steelhead” about 9am swinging a big purple leech on a sink tip and those things do get the heart pumping before the big letdown.

Most of us went after trout and the morning fishing was very slow. John Warren got on the board early with his new Euro Nymphing setup. About mid morning some very small mayflies and midges started hatching. I put on a #18 Brown WD-40 and managed a couple fish letting it tick the bottom under an indicator, however it wasn’t an “ah-ha” moment by any stretch of the imagination as every bite was hard to get. By lunchtime we were all ready to take a break from pounding the water.

Cheryl Kilhefner prepared a great lunch of home-made spaghetti, Caesar salad and garlic bread. There was more than enough for second helpings, so we all dug in!

For the afternoon fishing we tried a different spot downriver and it fished much better. John was doing well with his Euro nymphing rig with a black Euro nymph producing the most action. Most of the trout were 10” to 12” but a few bigger ones up to 15” were brought to hand. I did OK with WD-40’s in brown and black colors; it’s amazing the fish can find a fly that small in a big river like the Deschutes but they can. Trux broke away from fishing small flies got a nice rainbow swinging a leech pattern. It was a fun afternoon and just to maintain the civilized aspect of fly fishing, the bite died down around happy hour.

CFF September 22nd Fish-A-Long

This months Fish-A-Long will be held Saturday September 22nd on the Deschutes River at Beavertail Campground.

The plan: meet at Beavertail Campground between 8am and 9am. We’ll provide coffee and doughnuts then we hit the river! After morning fishing a hot lunch will be served-home made spaghetti with sauce by Cheryl Kilhefner from this summers tomato garden harvest.

Beavertail campground has ample parking and lots of good fishing water. It’s located 21 miles north of Maupin on the Lower Deschutes Access Rd. From Maupin to Shears Falls is paved and the last 10 or so miles to Beavertail is gravel road.

Gear: 4 to 6wt rods with matching reel & floating lines. Indicator nymphing rigs with small glo- bugs and/or standard nymphs like Pheasant Tails and Hair’s ears. Swinging for steelhead is a possibility too but reports indicate steelhead fishing has been slow. Waders with felt or cleated boots and layered clothing (can be cool in the morning).

This is a very nice time to fish the Deschutes River for trout – they’re usually hungry and can be concentrated below schools of spawning salmon, making for excellent fishing.  This is also a great fish along to make an overnight trip.

Please email Paul at ponzdog@icloud.com if you plan to attend so we can get a head count for the food.