December & January CFF Fishing Reports

Sorry I didn’t get the December 2021 reports out last month. We have some really good stuff and will start with January and work back to December. As always, pictures first with the reports below.

January 2022 CFF Fishing Reports

From David Doble: I have been after steelhead on the fly for three years. Had a bump or two over the past three years but either pulled the fly out of their mouths or lost them. Went fishing with a friend yesterday with Steelhead Outfitters (Sam Sickles) who we’ve fished with many times. We floated from Dodge Park to Oxbow on what was a very, very cold day. It was 23 degrees when we launched and did not improve much through the day. Ice in the guides continually hindered my spey casting which was entertaining as I already have hindered spey abilities.  

About mid morning I started short at the top of a run, increased distance and worked my way down. About half way down, I hooked into my first steelhead on a fly rod. A beautiful wild buck! We tailed it, took pics, and sent him on his way.

I went back to the top and made my way back through the run, near the bottom I hooked a second wild fish, a hen. She was a bit feisty and took me into the backing a couple of times. We tailed her and I gave her a big kiss before sending her off to make more babies. 

My feet are still cold! (Editor’s Note: Congrats David, this is huge! Great Job!!!)

From Chris Brehm: Spent a lot of time chasing winters. Had one good day on the Wilson with 2 fish on beads. Spent a day with my brother Steve on Lake Billy Chinook chasing Bull Trout. Cold in the morning but very pleasant later on. This little guy came on one of “Dave’s Devils” on a sink tip. Steve did a little better on an Olive Leech pattern. We caught about 20 fish between 10 and 22 inches. Some small Browns in the mix as well. Had a great day on the ocean out of Newport with limits of Lingcod and some Black Bass as well. No pics but a beautiful day on a nice ocean.

From Dennis Murphy: It was a rough month for fishing. I fished the Sandy at least three times per week and didn’t find any fish. I drove to California and fished the Klamath and found nothing but a good time with the folks at the Ashland Fly Shop (definitely worth it). Finally I decided I needed to remember what catching a fish was like and went to the Deschutes for my birthday. I got one nice redside on a stonefly nymph I tied (I was finding stoneflys crawling around in camp) then a windy rainstorm came in and ended the trip early.


From Tim McSweeney: I’ve been mostly fishing the Lower Deschutes for redsides. It’s been really, really good on glo bugs in the morning and if you can find yourself in the right spot at 1pm–a killer BWO hatch!

From Dave Kilhefner: Caught two small but fiesty steelhead on gear and missed a third due to tangled line on the takedown!

From George Krumm: Got a nice one bobber-dogging on the Sandy.

From Mike Shiiki: Here’s my son Nathaniel with a nice one at Macks Canyon on the Deschutes last weekend. The fuzzy egg bite was on and also had some eats on perdigons too. They were hugging the slower water close to the banks.

From Greg O’Brien: I travelled to Southern Oregon to fish some different water and managed to find a couple of hatchery steelhead.  Swung flies, hard takes and long runs made for a fun day.  The next day I got shut out of course!

December 2021 CFF Reports

From Ed Rabinowe: We found some big ones in Louisiana this year. Pushing those 10 wts to the limit!

From Lane Hoffman: Ken Baker and I went to Venice, La. Lots of big reds this year!

From Greg O’Brien: Fishing this month was limited to a trip down to the Klamath River near I-5 in CA with another club member.  We hired a guide for 2 days of fishing, ideally using Spey rods and swinging flies for late summer and Fall run steelhead.  Steelhead in the Klamath seem generally a fair bit smaller than the Columbia River tributary fish.  We hooked a couple Spey casting, but got quite a few more while fishing stonefly nymphs under an indicator while drifting between swing runs. While it was very cold, we got lucky and fished in between a couple pretty bad snow storms.

From Tim McSweeney: I had one good day on the Deschutes (right after our December Club meeting). Right before my kid brough covid home from school.

I tied on two glo bugs on at 8am and didnt change or take them off till the end of the day. Was on a fish about every 15 minutes for the majority of the day. Can’t beat that! It was probably 50/50 between redsides and short fin graylings.

I started the day euro nymphing but once the wind picked up I had to put a bobber on or it was pointless. For what it’s worth I started euro nymphing because I hated bobber fishing. But today I learned something. It’s not that I hated bobber fishing, it’s that I hated the classic Thingamabobbers. For me personally, they were a pain to get on and adjust the depth of my fly as I went from spot to spot. Hence euro nymphing. I can adjust depth more or less by how much line I have out or how high i hold my rod. Well I got some airlocks and it made bobber fishing totally enjoyable for which was great!  I’m oddly kind of excited I had fun bobbering it up. Just another fun way to fish.

From Rich Domingue: I hooked and lost my first winter steelhead on the lower Clack on Dec. 9 and I landed two yesterday (Dec 29). Pressure is high, making it hard to find room to swing, but also indicating others are catching fish as well. Given this early success, I am hopeful that this winter’s run will be considerably stronger than last years.

From Chris Brehm: I only got out once in very early December. This little brat was caught on a bead below a float near a popular North Coast Hatchery. Saw quite a few larger fish that day including several by a fly rodder fishing a bead under an indicator. He had to wade out quite a ways in fast water to cast, then chase them downstream to land them. Was fun to watch. I hope to get into some Winter Steelhead on my fly rod this year. Happy New Year !

February 2022 Presidents Message

A nice February winter run taken at the Willows on the Clackamas several years ago.

By all accounts winter steelhead fishing is pretty good, or at least much better than last year. A few club members have caught fish on gear this year and just this week we had a report of a couple fly caught steelhead; more on this in the upcoming fishing reports (which I’m late in getting out-sorry!). No matter how good the fishing might be, it is still winter steelhead fishing and that means lots of casting in the cold. Don’t risk losing a nice chromer by going light on your tippet; beef up those tippets with at least 12lb Maxima or 15 Fluorocarbon. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been at the fly shop and heard sad stories of big steelhead lost to light tippets.

Speaking of Fly Shops, after 40 years in business The Fly Fishing Shop in Welches is closing it’s doors. Mark & Patti have definitely put in their time and now want to retire. Here’s wishing them all the best!

I’m open to ideas for February 19th Fish A Long so if you have a preference please let me know. If a better idea does not come up, we will have another Winter Steelhead Fish A Long on the Upper Sandy River.

Brad and Tom are looking for new ideas for the 2022 Fly Fishing Challenge. Additionally, they’ve mentioned it’s hard to gauge membership interest in the Challenge and that it may be time to take a year off. Please email Brad if you’d like to have one this year.

For several years now we have been posting monthly fishing reports. Looking back on them is a good way to get ideas for local fly fishing opportunities currently happening or coming up. I’ve tested it out; type the word February or March in the search box and you’ll get all the past reports for that month.

Please remember our sponsors this, they are the lifeblood of the club. Stop by their shops and let them know your appreciate their support. Better yet buy something or book a trip. Good fishing!

Dave Kilhefner

Fly Tying January 2022: The Metal Detector

Marty Sheppard with a beautiful Winter Steelhead. Ed Ward Photo

For many of us, the dropping temperatures and increasing rainfall are signals that it must be time for the return of winter steelhead to our local waters. Instead of traveling to the Deschutes for our steelhead “fix” we are able to stay closer to home and fish local waters like the Clackamas and Sandy rivers.

Years ago, when asked to give me the name of a go-to winter steelhead fly, two of my reliable sources of information, Josh Linn and Dave Kilhefner, both mentioned the fly with the promising name of “Metal Detector”. When searching for a grab by a fish that has “steel” as part of its name, it makes sense that you can hardly go wrong with a fly called the Metal Detector. Dave didn’t hesitate at all in endorsing this fly for winter steelhead by flat-out stating that the Metal Detector was his personal favorite pattern.

Northwest guide Marty Sheppard is credited with coming up with the local version of the Metal Detector series of flies. Marty and his wife Mia have been the owners since 2003 of Little Creek Outfitters, a guide service based in Maupin. They specialize in swinging flies with both two handed and single handed rods and regularly guide on the Deschutes, Grande Ronde, John Day, and Sandy rivers.

Marty, along with his friend Josh Linn, experimented with a variety of materials in hopes of coming up with a large profile fly that was also easier to cast than some of the flies on the market at the time. The key turned out to be using materials that don’t soak up a lot of water. This makes the Metal Detector flies lighter and thus easier to cast than many flies of equivalent size. And we all know that heavy flies and sink tips can turn a promising day of fishing into an unpleasant chore. Marty Sheppard’s fly was originally tied with bucktail but now is also tied with finn raccoon. Both materials are buoyant, absorb little water, and also don’t clump together when wet. Some tyers use craft fur, a synthetic, for the same reason, and it is fairly inexpensive. Polar chenille, while also absorbing little water, is included in the body to give a translucent glow from the inside out. The flies are finished off with a marabou collar which provides added movement in the water. Trailing stinger hooks are used to help ensure the greater chance of a hookup.

Metal Detectors are usually two-toned flies with favorite color combinations being black and blue, and red and orange. Black and blue is especially good on overcast days, dark conditions, or when the water is off color. The red and orange flies are preferred in bright sunlight or when the water is especially clear. A green version is good in the late winter and summer seasons when sculpins get active plus it’s also a great trout spey pattern.

RECIPE

Thread: 6/0; black or color of choice

Shank: shank of choice ( one-eyed OPST shank, or Waddington shank)

Wire: Senyo’s Intruder Trailer Hook Wire (or Beadalon bead stringing wire from Michael’s)

Stinger Hook: Gamakatsu #2 octopus hook mounted onto wire loop

Weight: cone head, cyclops bead, dazl-eyes, or dumbbell eyes; optional: no weight. The purpose of the weight is not to sink the fly but help it turn over in wind, so don’t overdo it!

Tail: finn raccoon, bucktail, or craft fur; color of choice

Body: polar chenille; color of choice

Flash: EP brush wrapped on shank (or flash of choice anchored onto shank or wrapped in dubbing loop)

Collar: marabou wound on shank; color of choice

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Tie on, or slide on, the weight (optional) of your choice onto shank.

2. Measure a length of stinger loop wire so that the rear of the stinger hook will reach back the desired distance from the head of the fly. It is important that the loop be big enough to allow the stinger hook to be changed out if it becomes dull. (Don’t use your good scissors to cut the wire!)

The total length of the fly is usually 3 to 3-1/2 inches.

*** Note: You can slide the stinger hook onto the wire now or add it later. If you add the hook now, be very careful because the hooks are very sharp and tend to grab onto such things as fingers or fly tying materials that get too close.

3. Attach the loop of stinger hook wire onto the shank by securing it with tight thread wraps and then coating the thread wraps lightly with super glue. Allow the super glue to soak in and set up.

4. Prepare a clump of tail material, and attach it securely onto the shank with thread wraps. The tail should extend to the rear of the stinger hook.

5. Tie in a length of polar chenille at the base of the tail.

6. Wind the polar chenille forward, stroking the fibers rearward with each wrap. Tie off the polar chenille about a 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch distance behind the weighted head.

7. Add some flash in front of the polar chenille using one of the following options:

Option A. Attach a piece of EP brush at the front of the polar chenille and make 1-2 wraps of the brush. Anchor it with thread wraps and remove the excess. (The EP brush has a core made of wire so don’t use your good scissors to cut it.)

Option B. Create a dubbing loop and insert some flash of choice into the loop and twist it closed. Make some wraps of the dubbing loop flash. Tie it off and remove the excess.

Option C. Add some flash of your choice by tying in some small clumps around the top, bottom and sides of the fly.

8. Attach a marabou feather by the tip in front of the flash. Wind it forward filling in the space behind the weight. Stroke the marabou fibers rearward with each wrap. You may find it helpful to wet the marabou to help you control it. Tie it off. Remove the excess marabou. Whip finish. Add head cement.

Below you will find a link for an an updated version of the Metal Detector from The Royal Treatment fly shop that you should check out:

https://www.royaltreatmentflyfishing.com/blogs/everything-fly-fishing/metal-detector-20/

It is interesting that many of the Metal Detectors found in fly shop bins will be tied on metal shanks, while Dave Kilhefner says that Marty actually ties most of his own on tubes because tubes are faster and easier to tie, which is important when you are a guide providing flies for your clients. Below are some of Marty’s favorites:

In his recent President’s Message, Dave Kilhefner reported that this month’s Fish-Along will focus on winter steelhead fishing and will be held January 22 at OxBow Park on the Sandy River. So now is the time to get ready by checking those fly boxes to make sure you have a full arsenal of winter steelhead patterns. Maybe the Metal Detector will become one of your go-to winter steelhead flies.

Presidents Message January 2022

Happy New Year! I hope everyone was able to enjoy some festivities even with the unusually cold weather. I didn’t quite make it to midnight this year but started the New Year off right by BBQing the first two nights.

I’m looking forward to the New Year and have a couple “fishing resolutions” to share. First is to Camp and backpack more, which blends in perfectly with our Fish  A Longs. Second is to Euro nymph most of the small streams on Mt Hood. Lastly, use my boat more. I have a pretty cool little boat that is good for chasing Steelhead on the Clackamas and Bass on the Willamette.

Clackamas Fly Fishers has reinstituted membership fees for 2022. However if you paid to be a member in 2021 it will be good for 2022 too. Here is the membership link plus I will be sending membership notices out to everyone. Last year I let membership tracking lapse so if you paid in 2021 you’ll need to let me know.

Just like last month, everyone that comes to the January 18th meeting at High Rocks will get a free beer on me. The speaker with be the Deschutes River Alliance and most likely they will be on Zoom on the big screen TV.

We’ll have our January 22nd Fish A Long at Oxbow Park. We have the covered area “A” reserved which is where the Sandy River Spey Clave’s have been held in the past and will focus on Winter Steelhead Fly Fishing with both Spey and Indicator methods demonstrated.

Once the water drops in a week or so we should have good opportunities for winter steelhead and we’ve already had a few good reports come in. For several years now we have been posting monthly fishing reports. Looking back on them is a good way to get ideas for local fly fishing opportunities currently happening or coming up. I’ve tested it out; type the word January or February in the search box and you’ll get all the past reports for that month.

January is a great month to get good deals after Christmas so get out to your local fly shop buy all the stuff that Santa forgot. Please remember our sponsors, they are the lifeblood of the club. Stop by their shops and let them know your appreciate their support. Better yet buy something or book a trip.

Dave Kilhefner

November 2021 Fishing Reports

November is a sleeper month for fishing but when water conditions are right it can be really good! Thanks to everyone for sharing your reports! Pictures are first with the reports below.

From Darryl Huff: Fishing was good on the Deschutes except during short periods when river flows were rising and falling. Egg patterns remained a favorite as fish were waiting for salmon eggs. At times the trout were very interested in euro nymphs and swung flies. A hand full of steelhead were hooked and released on the trout setups.

From Hugo Jim: At the beginning of the month I went to the Kilchis and got a few Chums. This Thanksgiving I visited Hawaii with my wife and kid, while we were there I took a day to chase after Bonefish. It wasn’t easy but the guide helped me landed my first Hawaii Bonefish. During the visit at Oahu’s Polynesian Cultural Center, I lost to my daughter during our fishing competition at the Tahiti Island Village. 

From Chris Brehm: Only got out once in November. Coho come into Tahkenitch and Ten Mile lakes in November-December. You are allowed one unclipped fish per day, 5 per season. I tried getting them on streamers, but these were all caught on light spinning tackle with twitching jigs and spinners in beautiful weather.  It’s a fun fishery because the Coho like to hang out near the shore and logs. Almost feels like Bass fishing.

Presidents Message December 2021

I hope everyone enjoyed a nice Thanksgiving. Fishing was challenging in November with the big rain storm that rolled thru in the middle of the month but some folks did well as you’ll see when I post the November fishing reports.

Clackamas Fly Fishers has reinstituted membership fees for 2022. However if you paid to be a member in 2021 it will be good for 2022 too. Here is the membership link plus I will be sending membership notices out to everyone. Last year I let membership tracking lapse so if you paid in 2021 you’ll need to let me know. That said, if you participate in the club I will guarantee you’ll get a solid value for the $35 you pay to be a member.

To get the membership value package started off right everyone that comes to the December and January meetings at High Rocks will get a free beer on me. This suggestion comes courtesy of Tom Flannery who helps Brad with the Fly fishing Challenge. BTW, the 2021 challenge is still going on. If you’ve completed the challenge please email me or Brad.

The “big 3” activities our club focuses on are meetings, fly tying and fish a longs. Looking forward we are going to have a few in-person speakers next year but mostly Zoom speakers on the big screen TV at High Rocks. Why? Zoom presentations cost much less because there are no travel expenses. Also, we can book speakers from all over the country & not just within driving distance. Fly tying will still be limited to monthly fly tying articles as COVID is still with us. Fish a longs will be expanded to include camping whenever possible as last year many of the people that came to the fish a longs camped too whenever this was possible. I’m still in the planning phase so if you have suggestions by all means let me know!

December is shaping up to be decent fishing month with the most dependable fishing available at the Oregon Fishing Club ponds for trout, especially after a warming trend. Here’s a good winter trout fishing primer from Vickie Loftus After that dang November storm blew thru we’ve had good water conditions and good timing is the key to taking advantage of winter fishing. You’ll need to be packed and ready to hit the prime fishing windows when they open up. Several coastal streams like the Necanicum and North Fork Nehalem get good early runs of steelhead. The Clackamas and Sandy get random shots of early winter steelhead too plus this year there are a good number of native, late running coho this year. Here’s a link to the PGE fish counts so you can see for yourself.

We don’t have a club Fish-A-Long in December but I put out the word that I’m open to helping folks with their spey casting and winter steelhead presentation basics. I’ve got 4 people signed up so far so if you are interested in this email me and I’ll put you on the list.

For several years now we have been posting monthly fishing reports. Looking back on them is a good way to get ideas for local fly fishing opportunities currently happening or coming up. I’ve tested it out and it works! Type the word December or January in the search box and you’ll get all the past reports for that month.

Now is the perfect time for Christmas shopping plus don’t forget to get your wish list out so you get all the stocking stuffers you want. Please remember our sponsors, they are the lifeblood of the club. Stop by their shops and let them know your appreciate their support. Better yet buy something or book a trip.

Dave Kilhefner

October 2021 Fishing Reports

October is a big fly fishing month and so we have a lot of good reports to share. As always, pictures are first with the reports below. Enjoy!

From Wayne Hughes: October day on the Willamette river featured both Smallmouth bass, Jack Salmon and Silvers during the float. White & blue Clousers caught everything that day. 

From George Krumm: My annual trip to swing for Naknek rainbows went well. I also did a fly-out to Ugashik Narrows to fish for Arctic char. We caught lots of big rainbows. The char are Arctic Char & not Dolly Varden. Fish bit on a variety of flies like my LST (big-ass Leechy Sculpiny Thing) and flesh flies. I host a trip up there every year.  If anyone wants to join me next year, the dates are October 1st – 8th, 2022. I have 3 or 4 spots left.

From Chris Brehm: I was planning to attend the October Fish a long but got a last minute tip from a friend about fresh Coho in the Siuslaw tidewater near Mapleton. We landed and released 10 bright (but all native) Coho on Twitching Jigs and Spinners.

After reading the Fishalong report, I made the trip to Beavertail on the Deschutes on October 27th. Using egg patterns I was able to land a few up to about 14″ along with some whitefish. From there I drove to Bend to fish two days before the season closed on Crane Prairie. A buddy and I landed about 15 fish in good weather on Thursday and about 25 more in drizzly weather on Friday in  47 degree water. The fish were in prime fat condition, sized from 14″ to 20″ and were caught using various methods including my lucky Red Bead Pine Squirrel Leech pattern. The attached photo is from a previous trip, but illustrates why this is one of my favorite fisheries.

From Mike Shiiki: The day after the fish a long my son Nathan and I went back to Beavertail and then down above “Grumpy’s” on Sunday. He brought one of his friends for his first fly fishing trip & had a great day. Beavertail was the same as the day before, but we got into a Whitefish convention downstream at the Grumpy’s run.  I lost count down there, but ALOT of whities along with one lost steelhead that busted off my 3 wt euro stick after coming out of the water 3 times.

Other pics: October at Timothy Lake in the float tubes was really good – my son and I, and Darryl reeled in multiple 24″ size rainbows; I heard ODFW dumped in a load of trophy sized fish and I’m assuming we landed some of them. 

I hit the Molalla 1 day, and only fished about 90 minutes but landed a cutthroat, a couple whitefish and a little rainbow.

Also my son hit the Wilson River and landed a couple nice cutties last month

From Greg O’Brien: Got out with another club member a couple of times in October. We had a trout spey day on the McKenzie that was slow due to rapidly rising water but managed a couple nice trout. We also got into a couple Coho on SW WA rivers. 

From Tim Mahoney: I went to the Metolius for a few days mid month and caught a few nice rainbows and a small Bull trout for my first time euro nymphing. It was cold in the mornings, but nice that it wasn’t overly crowded.

At the fish a long I caught one white fish. The next day I went down River to Macks Canyon area and caught about 15, half redsides and half white fish. The biggest redside was this 18” long. I also had a steelhead on for about 15 seconds as he stripped off line and jumped in the center of the River before the 5X tippet broke off. That’s was exciting!

From Dave Kilhefner: the weekend after the fish a long I went back to Beavertail and met up with Mike Shiiki and Darryl Huff. Fishing had slowed down a little but we all got into several trout and redsides. We tried standard indicator & Euro nymphing tactics, but Darryl’s indicator & bead was the most effective method this day.

CFF November 16th Meeting

Our November 16th meeting will feature local author Dennis Dauble talking about the History of Fish and Fishing in the Columbia Basin.

You can attend either the in-person meeting at High Rocks or watch the presentation on Zoom. Dennis will be talking to us via Zoom, and we will beam that in to the Big Screen TV at the High Rocks meeting room. We did this last month and it worked very well and the picture above is from last month. 

Here is the Zoom meeting link: 

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/84869996765?pwd=aldYeFMzMy9Xc0pmU1FTOW9FZ0h4UT09

I’ll be at High Rocks at 6pm for food, refreshments and conversation. The Zoom meeting will open up at 6:30 to get logged in and settled with the presentation starting at 7pm. 

We will also be awarding the 2021 Fly Fishing Challenge awards at this meeting. So far this year’s award winners are Dave Kilhefner, Mike Shiiki, Dan Molyneaux, Brad Jonasson, Gil Henderson, Tom Flannery, George Coutts and Paul Brewer. Award winners please try to attend in person. It’s understood there are Covid concerns, and some may opt out, but in-person presentations have several benefits.

We look forward to seeing everyone either in person or on Zoom!

Fly Tying November 2021 The Kilchis Killer

For the past few years our usual November Fish-A-Long venue has suffered from too little water, or too much water, and the event had to be canceled. This year our President Dave Kilhefner is optimistic that the conditions are shaping up nicely for an outing on Saturday, November 13th near Tillamook for Chum Salmon. The Kilchis River is our normal destination, although the Miami River also has a run of chums. If you have some extra time this month there are many more opportunities to catch chum salmon in Washington waters. Be sure to check out the Washington regulations if you plan to head up there.

Chum salmon are sometimes regarded as the “ugly stepsister” of all of the species of Pacific salmon. They can be chrome bright while still in the ocean but soon begin to develop characteristic markings as they prepare to enter freshwater. After entering rivers chum salmon are readily identifiable by their characteristic olive green coloration with purplish vertical striping and blotches along their sides.

Chum salmon are sometimes referred to as dog salmon, with research showing two possible origins for that name. One explanation is that name comes from the impressive mouthful of sharp teeth seen in the males as they approach spawning time.

A second explanation is that the reference to dog salmon comes from the habit of Native Americans feeding the flesh of the chum salmon to their dogs. Chums are not known for their aerial acrobatics but they fight like bulldogs and are not brought in easily, so don’t go light in selecting your gear. And because of the imposing teeth, it would be a good idea to carry a quality pair of pliers.

One fly that has been shown to be very effective for chum salmon is The Kilchis Killer. Noted Oregon fly fisherman, author, and fly tyer John Shewey is credited with coming up with the design for this fly. The name of the fly might be a bit of a misnomer, at least for the state of Oregon, as all fishing for chums is strictly catch and release. Just consider it a killer fly for attracting the chums. The fly is normally tied in chartreuse. As Club member Lane Hoffman says, in regard to chum salmon, “it’s no use if it ain’t chartreuse”, regardless of the specific fly pattern you tie on. However, many anglers report that if the chums aren’t responding to chartreuse flies it is time to switch to something that is hot pink.

The Kilchis Killer is a relatively easy fly to tie and should be no problem for tyers of all levels of experience.

RECIPE

Hook: Heavy wire, size 2-6
Tail: Krystal Flash (chartreuse or pink)
Body: 1/2 Floss (chartreuse or pink), 1/2 Cactus Chenille (chartreuse or pink)
Wing: Krystal Flash (chartreuse or pink)
Collar: Hackle (Saddle or Schlappen; chartreuse or pink)

TYING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Lay down a base of thread wraps. (Now is the time to attach any weight, if desired.)
2. Add a tail of krystal flash.
3. Attach a piece of floss at the base of the tail. Wind the bobbin forward.
4. Wind the rear half of the body evenly with floss. Tie down the floss with thread at the midpoint of the hook shank.
5. Attach a piece of cactus chenille at the front of the floss. Wind the bobbin forward.
6. Wind the front half of the body with the cactus chenille. (Don’t crowd the front of the fly. Leave room for the wing, hackle, and thread head.) Anchor the cactus chenille with thread wraps.
7. Attach a clump of krystal flash in front of the cactus chenille, angling it back at about a 45 degree angle for the wing.
8. Attach a hackle feather at the base of the wing.
9. Wind the hackle forward, making each wrap just in front of the last one. Anchor the front of the hackle with thread wraps.
10. Form a head with thread wraps, whip finish, and add head cement.

Good luck fishing! This has historically been one of the club’s more popular trips. If the weather and river conditions cooperate, this is one Fish-A-Long where you really have a shot at catching a big fish!

Presidents Message November 2021

November is a very good fishing month as we transition from fall into winter. After several years of unusually dry fall weather we finally have some regular & normal rainfall!

When fall rains come often the rivers fill with leaves. When this happens I like to hit the Oregon Fishing Club ponds for trout, which are on the bite as the water cools down. If the mountain road conditions are good, trout fishing on the Deschutes is another top option. There is also rod breaking & hook straightening Chum Salmon in the Kilchis and Miami Rivers by Tillamook.

We’ll have another combination in-person & zoom meeting this month at High Rocks on Tuesday, November 16th. I’ll get an email out with the details next week.

The 2021 Fly Fishing Challenge is still going on and we have a very cool challenge pin this year-which is pictured. If you’ve completed the challenge please email me or Brad.

Last year Clackamas Fly Fishers extended paid memberships thru 2021. In 2022 we are going to resume paid memberships. If you paid to be a new member in 2021, it will be good for next year too. If you are a member and haven’t paid since 2020, you’ll need to pay dues in 2022. If that sounds a little confusing, don’t worry. We have a spreadsheet and are also pretty easy people to deal with.

We are shooting for Saturday November 13th for our Fish A Long. This date will be perfect for either Chum Salmon on the Kilchis River or for trout at one of the Oregon Fishing Club lakes. Unfortunately Wilder Lake was hit very hard by the hot summer weather and is not an option for a while.

For several years now we have been posting monthly fishing reports. Looking back on them is a good way to get ideas for local fly fishing opportunities currently happening or coming up. I’ve tested it out; type the word November or December in the search box and you’ll get all the past reports for that month.

Please remember our sponsors this fall, they are the lifeblood of the club. It’s not too early for a little Christmas shopping or putting together your wish list. Stop by their shops and let them know your appreciate their support. Better yet buy something or book a trip.

Dave Kilhefner