Presidents Message May 2020

Greetings fellow Fly Fishers. As the COVID-19 situation persists sometimes all you can do is maintain your sense of humor. It’s good to see the Fly Fishing & Tying Journal is doing just that with their “what kind of trout is this” cover. We are all dealing with this in our own way and on my home front the yard looks great, my liver probably doesn’t and I’m gaining weight like a prize bull.

Spring fishing has taken a back seat but I’m still getting out a little and catching a few. George Coutts and I have hit the OFC ponds a couple times by meeting at the OC Home Depot and carpooling from there, wearing our masks in the car. It seems to be a workable system. Others are getting out too. Recently Darry Huff texted a picture of his first summer steelhead of the year; May is the best month of the year to pursue Clackamas Summer Steelhead. Several of you have journeyed over to Rocky Ridge and caught some trout as big as steelhead. It’s a big fish year over there.

If you haven’t been able to get out I have free FFTJ’s for anyone that wants them while supplies last; just send me an email and we’ll figure out how to get a copy into your hands. Also, you can take advantage of our well stocked Library.

Our local fly shops recently opened their doors to walk in traffic, just be sure to be courteous, maintain social distance even if you don’t believe in it and of course wear a mask.

The May 19th meeting is uncertain. Our May speaker is not traveling so if High Rocks opens we’ll have to think of something else, and we will if allowed! I’ll keep everyone posted by email as the situation unfolds.

Some members really want the May 23rd Fish a Long at Timothy Lake to happen, so it probably will. Our launch site at Oak Fork Campground is due to open May 22nd. To maintain social distancing everyone will need to bring their own lunch & beverages. Also, it’s $5 to park. I’ll get the details posted as the date approaches.

The return to a more normal life is starting to unfold but at a decidedly slow and cautious pace. It’s like trying to watch a spring flower bloom; you can’t see it happening but then one day it does. I’m ready!

Dave Kilhefner

2019 CFF July Reports

Sorry for the late posting but there was lots of good fishing in July this year, so this is a long post with lots of pictures. Enjoy!

Mark & Patty Bachmann of The Fly Fishing Shop made their annual trip to Loreto Mexico. Here is their report: https://flyfishusa.com/blog/Loreto-BCS-MX-Fishing-Report-Summer-2019

July speaker Elke Littleleaf had a great month on the Deschutes, landing many fine redsides like the one pictured.

With the cloudy early July weather Rob Crandall has been sneaking out on the Clackamas River and swinging up a few summer steelhead.

Nick Wheeler got this awesome Bull Trout euro nymphing for rainbow trout after work.

Greg O’Brien had a great day on Trillium Lake with his daughter Abigail. Her smile says it all!

Jim Adams got away to East Lake for a few hours while at Sunriver with family.There is usually a good callibaetis hatch late morning through midday during the summer at East, although the hatch was not as impressive as last year. Caught six fish. Five Rainbows, the biggest being 18”.  Also one kokanee, that put up quite a fight for its size. Unlike last year, no browns were caught  but saw one about 24″ take a callibaetis natural off the surface about two rod lengths from me, which got the adrenaline going. Caught fish on three different patterns: leech, callibaetis nymph and callibaetis cripple.

Adrian Choat went camping for 2 weeks camping at Crane Prairie. Spent mornings fishing from a kayak with best results stripping black wolly buggers and small red buggers. There was very little top water action. There are some large aggressive fish in Crane and he was broken off several times on 3x tippet.

Mark & Patty Bachman have been fishing Timothy Lake. They started with float tubes, then wend to pontoon boats. The last couple outings they’ve used their jet boat, allowing them to see the whole lake as never before. Fishing was great all day, every day even though the water temperature in the morning was 69-degrees and at dark it was over 74-degrees. Most of the fish we caught were planted rainbows that averaged 10-14 inches, the largest were 15-16 inches.  During the morning and most of the day small wooly buggers did the trick. Most of those fish were caught with type-2 and type-3 sinking lines while fishing in about 15-feet of water. A slow twitchy retrieve with the fly near the bottom was amazingly productive. They saw a few Hexagenia mayflies one morning around 10:00 o’clock, but the fish didn’t pay any attention to them. The main hatch started with sporadic emergence about 4:00 in the afternoon, then gradually increased until dark. Fishing emergers in the dark resulted in a fish nearly every cast for about an hour and then died. 

Richard Harvey has been chasing resident Coho along the beaches on Puget Sound. They are getting very active and taking baitfish patterns.

Greg O’Brien did a good bit of fishing in July. Harriett Lake produced a few browns on emergers, Dory fishing out of Pacific City was hot for Black Rockfish plus a cool Cabezon and a few Coho all on flies. He also hit an OFC property for bass and bluegill. He also floated the Deschutes from Beavertail to the mouth; they got several grabs, caught a big bass and a few nice trout on swung steelhead flies. He also hooked & lost a nice steelhead Euro nymphing for trout, which got about 100 yards downstream and broke his 5.5x tippet.

Hugo Jim went on a family camping trip at Lost Lake in mid July. He fished both from my pontoon and from the shore, taking fish on Adams dry flies and sub surface pattern such as leeches. The Hex hatch was slow when he was there.

Carson Taylor also fishing Lost Lake with the Washington County Fly Fishers July 13th fish-along. Everyone caught a dozen+ fish, mostly around 10 inches. Carson caught a brown around 14-15 inches and a 12-13 inch rainbow; but there are some larger fish! Olive woolly buggers and callibaetis nymphs worked best. On the way home the Hood River Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum (waaamuseum.org) is worth a stop.